Mitt Romney. Photo: Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) dismissed President Trump's latest tweets attacking the lawmaker on Thursday, stating he does not follow the president on Twitter and that he's unconcerned about the president's criticisms, per The Hill.

Reality check: A search shows that Romney's personal account, @MittRomney, does, in fact, follow @realDonaldTrump on Twitter — the account from which the president has authored the attacks, but his @SenatorRomney account does not.

Mitt Romney's "Following" list via Twitter.

The big picture: Romney has been one of few prominent Republicans to question Trump's contact with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Trump asked Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, Hunter, over unsubstantiated corruption allegations. The call and subsequent whistleblower complaint has led to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi launching a formal impeachment inquiry into Trump.

""First of all, I don't follow the president on Twitter so I don't see all of his tweets. But secondly, you know in my business if you got concerned about criticism, you'd be in the wrong business. So I just don't worry about those things."
— Mitt Romney told reporters on Thursday

Romney has also spoken out against Trump for inviting China to investigate the Bidens, stating last week: "When the only American citizen President Trump singles out for China’s investigation is his political opponent in the midst of the Democratic nomination process, it strains credulity to suggest that it is anything other than politically motivated."

Between the lines: Romney has not confirmed whether he would back impeaching Trump, should the House vote in favor of the measure and send the issue to the Senate.

  • "That something which I would have to consider down the road," Romney said.

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