Nov 5, 2019

McConnell: Trump would be acquitted if Senate trial were held today

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters on Tuesday that if an impeachment trial took place today, the Senate would acquit President Trump, Politico reports.

The big picture: McConnell recently claimed that impeachment would fail under his leadership in the Senate, despite acknowledging last week that he would have "no choice" but to put Trump on trial if the House approves the articles of impeachment. McConnell has indicated that such a trial would be handled quickly.

  • McConnell also said he hasn't yet spoken with his Democratic counterpart Sen. Chuck Schumer about a plan for a Senate impeachment trial, but that he'd likely start by evaluating the agreement the two parties struck during the Clinton impeachment trial.

What he's saying:

“I will say I’m pretty sure how it’s likely to end. If it were today I don’t think there’s any question — it would not lead to a removal. So the question is how long does the Senate want to take? How long do the presidential candidates want to be here on the floor of the Senate instead of in Iowa and New Hampshire?”
— Mitch McConnell

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A protest near the White House on Sunday night. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

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Dozens of journalists across the country tweeted videos Saturday night of themselves and their crews getting arrested, being shot at by police with rubber bullets, targeted with tear gas by authorities or assaulted by protesters.

Driving the news: The violence got so bad over the weekend that on Sunday the Cleveland police said the media was not allowed downtown unless "they are inside their place of business" — drawing ire from news outlets around the country, who argued that such access is a critical part of adequately covering protests.