Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday accepted his re-nomination at the Republican National Convention, where he briefly mentioned the protests that have erupted in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd and the shooting of Jacob Blake: "Let me be clear: the violence must stop — whether in Minneapolis, Portland, or Kenosha."

Why it matters: President Trump and Pence are running on a "law and order" message that speakers have relentlessly underscored on each day of the RNC, warning of an America overrun by left-wing "mobs" under a Biden administration. Pence did not address the incidents of police brutality that have set off many of the protests, and rejected the idea of systemic racism in law enforcement.

What he's saying: "President Donald Trump and I will always support the right of Americans to peaceful protest, but rioting and looting is not peaceful protest, tearing down statues is not free speech. Those who do so will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law," Pence said.

  • "Last week, Joe Biden didn’t say one word about the violence and chaos engulfing cities across this country. Let me be clear: the violence must stop – whether in Minneapolis, Portland, or Kenosha."
  • "Too many heroes have died defending our freedoms to see Americans strike each other down. We will have law and order on the streets of America. The American people know we don’t have to choose between supporting law enforcement, and standing with African American neighbors to improve the quality of life in our cities and towns."
  • "From the first days of this administration, we have done both. And we will keep doing both for four more years in the White House. Joe Biden says America is systemically racist. And that law enforcement in America has a, quote, “implicit bias” against minorities."

Reality check: Pence claimed that Biden responded "absolutely" when asked in an interview whether he supported cutting funding to police departments. Biden does not support "defunding the police," a message that many progressives have promoted, but said in an interview with activist Ady Barkan that he "absolutely" supports redirecting some funding to address mental health issues or prison reform.

The bottom line: "The hard truth is you won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America. Under President Trump, we will stand with those who stand on the Thin Blue Line, and we’re not going to defund the police – not now, not ever," Pence said.

Go deeper

Sep 23, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump refuses to commit to peaceful transfer of power if he loses

President Trump repeatedly refused to say on Wednesday whether he would commit to a peaceful transition of power if he loses the election to Joe Biden, saying at a press briefing, "We're going to have to see what happens."

The big picture: Trump has baselessly claimed on a number of occasions that the only way he will lose the election is if it's "rigged," claiming — without evidence — that mail-in ballots will result in widespread fraud. Earlier on Wednesday, the president said he wants to quickly confirm a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg because he believes the Supreme Court may have to decide the result of the election.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. EST: 32,135,220 — Total deaths: 981,660 — Total recoveries: 22,149,441Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m EST: 6,975,980 — Total deaths: 202,738 — Total recoveries: 2,710,183 — Total tests: 98,481,026Map.
  3. Politics: House Democrats prepare new $2.4 trillion coronavirus relief package.
  4. Health: Cases are surging again in 22 states — New York will conduct its own review of coronavirus vaccine.
  5. Business: America is closing out its strongest quarter of economic growth.
  6. Technology: 2020 tech solutions may be sapping our resolve to beat the pandemic.
  7. Sports: Pac-12 will play this fall despite ongoing pandemic — Here's what college basketball will look like this season.
  8. Science: Global coronavirus vaccine initiative launches without U.S. or China — During COVID-19 shutdown, a common sparrow changed its song.
5 hours ago - Sports

Pac-12 will play football this fall, reversing course

A view of Levi's Stadium during the 2019 Pac-12 Championship football game. Photo: Alika Jenner/Getty Images

The Pac-12, which includes universities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon, Utah and Washington state, will play football starting Nov. 6, reversing its earlier decision to postpone the season because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: The conference's about-face follows a similar move by the Big Ten last week and comes as President Trump has publicly pressured sports to resume despite the ongoing pandemic. The Pac-12 will play a seven-game conference football season, according to ESPN.

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