Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney said on "Fox News Sunday" that reporters misinterpreted comments he made on Oct. 17 about President Trump conditioning $400 million in aid to Ukraine on its government opening political investigations.

The exchange:

MULVANEY: "You've again said, just a few seconds ago, that I said there was a quid pro quo. Never use that language, because there is not a quid pro quo."
CHRIS WALLACE: "You were asked by Jonathan Karl, 'You've described a quid pro quo,' and you said, 'That happens all the time.'"
MULVANEY: "Reporters will use their language all the time, so my language never said quid pro quo. But let's get back to the heart of the matter. Go back and look at that list of the three things. What was I talking about? Things that it was legitimate for the president to do. No. 1, it is legitimate for the president to want to know what's going on with the ongoing investigation into the server. Everyone acknowledges that. ... No. 2, it is legitimate to tie the aid to corruption. It is legitimate to tie the aid to foreign aid from other countries. That's what I was talking about with the three. Can I see how people took that the wrong way? Absolutely. But I never said there was a quid pro quo because there isn't."

The big picture: House Democrats opened an impeachment inquiry into President Trump over allegations that he pressured Ukraine to investigate his political opponent, Joe Biden.

  • In his press conference, Mulvaney emphasized that Biden was never part of the calculus in suspending the military aid, but he said that Ukraine's willingness to investigate a conspiracy theory involving a Democratic Party computer server was certainly a factor.

Reality check: The assertion that the DNC's hacked server is in Ukraine is part of an easily debunked right-wing conspiracy theory that alleges that CrowdStrike, the first firm to publicly release evidence that Russia perpetrated the DNC hack, made up information to fuel the Russia investigation.

The big picture: Mulvaney's comments elicited widespread shock and claims that Trump's top aide had publicly admitted to a quid pro quo.

  • Later that day, Mulvaney said in a statement: "The president never told me to withhold any money until the Ukrainians did anything related to the server. The only reasons we were holding the money was because of concern about lack of support from other nations and concerns over corruption."
  • Mulvaney told Wallace that he "absolutely" did not offer Trump his resignation after the press conference: "I'm very happy working there. Did I have the perfect press conference? No. But again, the facts are on our side."

Go deeper: Trump's shout-it-out-loud strategy for allegations of illegality

Go deeper

Updated 21 mins ago - World

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrested under national security law

Media tycoon Jimmy Lai at the Next Digital offices in Hong Kong in June. Photo: Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Jimmy Lai has been arrested for "collusion with foreign powers" and the offices of his newspaper raided, said Mark Simon, an executive at the tycoon's media firm Next Digital on Monday.

Why it matters: He was arrested under the new national security law that gives Beijing more powers over the former British colony. Lai is the most prominent person arrested under the law — which prompted the U.S. to sanction Chinese officials, including Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, over Beijing's efforts to strip the territory of its autonomy.

Updated 31 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 a.m. ET: 19,861,683 — Total deaths: 731,326 — Total recoveries — 12,115,825Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 a.m. ET: 5,044,864 — Total deaths: 162,938 — Total recoveries: 1,656,864 — Total tests: 61,792,571Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi says states don't have the funds to comply with Trump's executive order on unemployment — Mnuchin says Trump executive orders were cleared by Justice Department.
  4. States: New York reports lowest rate of positive coronavirus test results since pandemic began
  5. Public health: Ex-FDA head: U.S. will "definitely" see 200,000 to 300,000 virus deaths by end of 2020. 
  6. Schools: 97,000 children test positive for coronavirus in two weeks — Nine test positive at Georgia school where photo showing packed hallway went viral .

97,000 children test positive for coronavirus in two weeks

A boy has his temperature checked as he receives a free COVID-19 test in South Los Angeles in July. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

At least 97,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 in the final two weeks of July and there's been an estimated 338,000 cases involving kids in the U.S. since the pandemic began, a new report finds.

Why it matters: The findings in the report by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association comes as schools and day cares look to reopen in the U.S., with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announcing Friday that school districts in the state can reopen in the fall amid lower coronavirus transmission rates.