Impossible Foods

Impossible Foods, the Bay Area startup aiming to replace meat with its now-patented plant-based substitute, plans to announce Tuesday that it has raised $75 million in new funding, in the form of a convertible note. The lead investor is Singapore-based investment company Temasek, with Bill Gates, the Open Philanthropy Project, Khosla Ventures and Horizon Ventures also participating.

The move comes as the company is expanding from gourmet restaurants into fast casual burger joints, including last week's addition of Bay Area chain Gott's.

Why it matters: The company would like to some day offer not just ground meat, but alternatives to fish, chicken, steak, eggs and cheese. And that will take some serious cash.

How it works: Impossible makes its burger "meat" from something called soy leghemoglobin, produced from genetically modified yeast and a fermentation process. "Our scientists spent so much time and effort studying a single molecule -- heme -- because heme is what makes meat taste like meat," Impossible Foods CEO and Founder Patrick Brown said in a statement.

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

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Senate Democrats on Wednesday blocked a vote on Republicans' $500 billion targeted COVID-19 relief bill, a far less comprehensive package than the $1.8 trillion+ deal currently being negotiated between the Trump administration and House Democrats.

Why it matters: There's little appetite in the Senate for a stimulus bill with a price tag as large as what President Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi have been calling for. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) "skinny" proposal was mostly seen as a political maneuver, as it had little chance of making it out of the Senate.

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The recent firestorm over the New York Post’s publication of stories relying on data from a hard drive allegedly belonging to Hunter Biden shows the increasingly hazy line between domestic political “dirty tricks” and a foreign-sponsored disinformation operation.

Why it matters: This haziness could give determined actors cover to conduct influence operations aimed at undermining U.S. democracy through channels that just look like old-fashioned hard-nosed politics.

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