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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Wednesday he does not see a "realistic path to quickly pass" a House-approved standalone measure for $2,000 stimulus checks, despite calls from President Trump for increased payments.

Why it matters: The move effectively kills any pathway to pass the bill before the end of the the 116th Congress.

What he's saying: McConnell said he has no intention of splitting apart a broader package that combines the checks with Trump's demands for an election fraud commission and the repeal of legal protections for tech companies — two no-gos for Democrats.

  • "The Senate is not going to split apart the three issues that President Trump linked together just because Democrats are afraid to address two of them," the leader said from the Senate floor.
  • "The Senate is not going to be bullied into rushing out more borrowed money into the hands of Democrats' rich friends that don't need the help," he added.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) slammed McConnell's remarks, saying, "at the very least, the Senate deserves the opportunity for an up-or-down vote."

  • Schumer again attempted to move the House's proposal, but McConnell immediately blocked it as he did on Tuesday.

Between the lines: Trump has been at war with McConnell for days over his and Democrats' push to raise stimulus checks from $600 to $2,000.

  • Earlier this week, 44 House Republicans joined the majority of Democrats to pass the House's standalone measure.
  • Some Senate Republicans have coalesced around Trump's bid for increased checks, including Georgia Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, who have runoff elections next week.
  • Fellow GOP Sens. Josh Hawley (Mo.), Marco Rubio (Fla.) and Lindsey Graham (S.C.) have also publicly supported the raise.

Go deeper: Trump slams McConnell for blocking vote on $2,000 stimulus checks

Go deeper

Jan 26, 2021 - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

Top Democrats introduce bill to raise minimum wage to $15 by 2025

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A group of top Democrats on Tuesday introduced legislation to gradually increase the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour over five years.

Why it matters: The policy, which has widespread support among Democratic lawmakers, aligns with what President Joe Biden has called for in his emergency COVID-19 relief package. It would more than double the current minimum wage of $7.25.

Most Senate Republicans join Rand Paul effort to dismiss Trump's 2nd impeachment trial

Photo: Joshua Roberts-Pool/Getty Images

Forty-five Senate Republicans, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, supported an effort to dismiss former President Trump's second impeachment trial.

Why it matters: The vote serves as a precursor to how senators will approach next month's impeachment trial, making it highly unlikely the Senate will vote to convict. The House impeached Trump for a second time for "incitement of insurrection" following events from Jan 6. when a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol.