Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Simon & Schuster announced Monday that it will publish a tell-all book written by President Trump's niece Mary on July 14 — two weeks earlier than previously planned — due to "high demand and extraordinary interest."

Why it matters: The current No. 1 book on Amazon's best-seller list — titled, “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man" — is expected to shed light on intimate details of the president's family life from the perspective of Mary Trump, who has a doctorate in psychology.

  • Simon & Schuster's decision comes days after a New York appellate judge overturned an injunction against the publishing company, allowing it to move forward with publication over the objections of Trump's family.
  • The president has claimed that Mary Trump signed a nondisclosure agreement and is "not allowed" to publish her book.

What they're saying:

"Mary Trump spent much of her childhood in her grandparents’ large, imposing house in the heart of Queens, New York where Donald and his four siblings grew up. She describes a nightmare of traumas, destructive relationships, and a tragic combination of neglect and abuse. She explains how specific events and general family patterns created the damaged man who currently occupies the Oval Office, including the strange and harmful relationship between Fred Trump and his two oldest sons, Fred Jr. and Donald.
A firsthand witness to countless holiday meals and family interactions, Mary brings an incisive wit and unexpected humor to sometimes grim, often confounding events. She recounts in unsparing detail everything from her uncle Donald’s place in the family spotlight and Ivana’s penchant for regifting to her grandmother’s frequent injuries and the appalling way Donald, Fred Trump’s favorite son, dismissed and derided him when he began to succumb to Alzheimer's."
— Simon & Schuster statement

Go deeper: Trump says niece "not allowed" to write book because of nondisclosure agreement

Go deeper

Sanders: "This is an election between Donald Trump and democracy"

Photo: BernieSanders.com

In an urgent appeal on Thursday, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) said President Trump presented "unique threats to our democracy" and detailed a plan to ensure the election results will be honored and that voters can cast their ballots safely.

Driving the news: When asked yesterday whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power if he loses, Trump would not, and said: "We're going to have to see what happens."

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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Early voting eclipses 2016 total with 12 days until election

People stand in line to vote early in Fairfax, Virginia in September. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Americans have cast more than 47.1 million ballots in the 2020 presidential election, surpassing the total early-vote count for 2016 with 12 days left until Election Day, according to a Washington Post analysis of voting data.

Why it matters: The election is already underway, as many states have expanded early and mail-in voting options because of the coronavirus pandemic.