Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Calls to regulate technology platforms like Google and Facebook aren't likely to result in new regulations anytime soon — and that's fine by a narrow majority of people who say they are concerned the government will go too far, according to an Axios/SurveyMonkey poll.

Expand chart

Data: SurveyMonkey poll conducted from Oct. 23 to Oct. 26. Poll data. Poll methodology; Chart: Axios Visuals

The backdrop: Top lawyers for Google, Facebook and Twitter will appear before a Senate subcommittee today to be grilled about how Russian actors used their platforms to target U.S. voters with divisive messages ahead of the 2016 presidential election. And some politicians on the left and right are calling for more scrutiny of the largest tech platforms as their power grows.

Bottom line: For all the ominous talk, a Republican Congress isn't going to clamp down too harshly on the tech companies, outside of the possibility of requiring new disclosures for paid political ads on their platforms. At least for now. That means that the congressional hearings over the next two days are mostly for show and to create some headaches for companies whose executives often avoid Capitol Hill appearances.

Additional stats:

  • 73% of respondents identifying as "very conservative Republicans" are worried about government overreach, compared to just 32% of those who identify as "very liberal Democrats."
  • 65% of very liberal Democrats say the government won't do enough to regulate how U.S. tech companies operate, while only 27% of very conservative Republicans feel that way.
  • Voters in both Trump states and Clinton states responded remarkably similarly, however: 53% of Trump state voters and 50% of Clinton state voters said they worry the government will go too far in restricting how U.S. tech companies operate.
  • 51% of all respondents say the government should not regulate major U.S. tech companies like public utilities; 45% say it should.

The hearing starts at 2:30 p.m. Eastern. Livestream here.

(Survey methodology: The data reported here come from an online survey conducted by SurveyMonkey Oct. 23-26, among 5,474 adults and has a modeled error margin of 2 percentage points. Respondents for this survey were selected from the nearly 3 million people who take surveys on the SurveyMonkey platform each day. Data have been weighted for age, race, sex, education, and geography using the Census Bureau's American Community Survey to reflect the demographic composition of the United States age 18 and over.)

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
5 mins ago - Technology

Apple sets September quarter sales record despite pandemic

Apple CEO Tim Cook, speaking at the Apple 12 launch event in October. Photo: Apple

Apple on Thursday reported quarterly sales and earnings that narrowly exceeded analysts estimates as the iPhone maker continued to see strong demand amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

What they's saying: The company said response to new products, including the iPhone 12 has been "tremendously positive" but did not give a specific forecast for the current quarter.

Supreme Court rejects second GOP effort to cut absentee ballot deadline in N.C.

Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images

The Supreme Court, for the second time in two days, rejected a GOP request to shorten the deadline mail-in ballots must be received by North Carolina officials to be counted.

The state of play: The state's deadline had been extended from 3 days to 9 days post-Election Day.

2 hours ago - Podcasts

The vaccine race turns toward nationalism

The coronavirus pandemic is worsening, both in the U.S. and abroad, with cases, hospitalizations and deaths all rising.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the state of global vaccine development — including why the U.S. and China seem to going at it alone — with medicinal chemist and biotech blogger Derek Lowe.