Jae C. Hong / AP

President Trump was not the first to use some of his most iconic phrases like "Make America great again" or "drain the swamp." In fact, he wasn't even the first U.S. president to use some of them:

Make America Great Again

Trump used the phrase as his campaign slogan. Red "MAGA" hats are now the most popular accessory for his supporters.

Ronald Reagan first used the phrase in 1980 on some of his campaign materials.

Bill Clinton also used the phrase a few times. "I want to attack these problems and make America great again," he said in an interview in 1992. And in 2008, he released a radio ad saying, "It's time for another comeback, time to make America great again. I know Hillary's the one that can do it."

Drain the swamp

Trump promised to "drain the swamp," or remove the toxic mix of big money and politics from D.C., toward the end of his campaign.

Reagan first used the phrase in 1983 in reference to limiting the power and growth of government.

Patrick Buchanan also used the phrase in 2000 for his acceptance speech as the Reform party's presidential nominee: "Neither Beltway party will drain this political swamp, because to them it is not a swamp; it is a protected wetland, their natural habitat."

The forgotten men and women

Trump: In his inaugural address, "the forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer," referring to those in middle America who elected him.

Richard Nixon used similar language during a campaign speech in San Francisco in 1968. He claimed that election day would be "a day of protest for the forgotten American" — the Americans who "obey the law, pay their taxes, go to church, send their children to school, love their country and demand new leadership."

America First

Trump has used "America First" to describe his foreign policy.

Kellyanne Conway wrote about "America First" in context of immigration back in 2014.

Before that the conservative politician Pat Buchanan used "America First!" as a presidential campaign slogan in 1992.

And before that, The America First Committee — formed by several Yale students, including Gerald Ford, in 1940 — protested U.S. involvement in World War II and, led by Charles Lindbergh, grew to 800,000 members nationwide, according to the Atlantic. Partly because of Lindbergh's views, the phrase has links to antisemitism.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - World

Pandemic plunges U.K. into "largest recession on record"

The scene near the Royal Exchange and the Bank of England in the City of London, England. Photo: Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

The United Kingdom slumped into recession as its gross domestic product GDP shrank 20.4% compared with the first three months of the year, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) confirmed Wednesday.

Why it matters: Per an ONS statement, "It is clear that the U.K. is in the largest recession on record." The U.K. has faired worse than any other major European economy from coronavirus lockdowns, Bloomberg notes. And finance minister Rishi Sunak warns the situation is likely to worsen.

Updated 2 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

The United Kingdom slumped into recession on Wednesday, as its gross domestic product GDP shrank 20.4% compared with the first three months of the year.

By the numbers: Over 741,400 people have died of the novel coronavirus globally and more than 20.2 million have tested positive, per Johns Hopkins. Almost 12.6 million have recovered from the virus.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 20,294,091 — Total deaths: 741,420— Total recoveries: 12,591,454Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 5,141,207 — Total deaths: 164,537 — Total recoveries: 1,714,960 — Total tests: 63,252,257Map.
  3. States: Georgia reports 137 coronavirus deaths, setting new daily record Florida reports another daily record for deaths.
  4. Health care: Trump administration buys 100 million doses of Moderna's coronavirus vaccine.
  5. Business: Moderna reveals it may not hold patent rights for vaccine.
  6. Sports: Big Ten scraps fall football season.
  7. World: Anthony Fauci "seriously" doubts Russia's coronavirus vaccine is safe