May 20, 2017

'MAGA' & other Trump slogans he didn't create

Jae C. Hong / AP

President Trump was not the first to use some of his most iconic phrases like "Make America great again" or "drain the swamp." In fact, he wasn't even the first U.S. president to use some of them:

Make America Great Again

Trump used the phrase as his campaign slogan. Red "MAGA" hats are now the most popular accessory for his supporters.

Ronald Reagan first used the phrase in 1980 on some of his campaign materials.

Bill Clinton also used the phrase a few times. "I want to attack these problems and make America great again," he said in an interview in 1992. And in 2008, he released a radio ad saying, "It's time for another comeback, time to make America great again. I know Hillary's the one that can do it."

Drain the swamp

Trump promised to "drain the swamp," or remove the toxic mix of big money and politics from D.C., toward the end of his campaign.

Reagan first used the phrase in 1983 in reference to limiting the power and growth of government.

Patrick Buchanan also used the phrase in 2000 for his acceptance speech as the Reform party's presidential nominee: "Neither Beltway party will drain this political swamp, because to them it is not a swamp; it is a protected wetland, their natural habitat."

The forgotten men and women

Trump: In his inaugural address, "the forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer," referring to those in middle America who elected him.

Richard Nixon used similar language during a campaign speech in San Francisco in 1968. He claimed that election day would be "a day of protest for the forgotten American" — the Americans who "obey the law, pay their taxes, go to church, send their children to school, love their country and demand new leadership."

America First

Trump has used "America First" to describe his foreign policy.

Kellyanne Conway wrote about "America First" in context of immigration back in 2014.

Before that the conservative politician Pat Buchanan used "America First!" as a presidential campaign slogan in 1992.

And before that, The America First Committee — formed by several Yale students, including Gerald Ford, in 1940 — protested U.S. involvement in World War II and, led by Charles Lindbergh, grew to 800,000 members nationwide, according to the Atlantic. Partly because of Lindbergh's views, the phrase has links to antisemitism.

Go deeper

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Hong Kong riot policeissue a warning as they aim to clear away people gathered downtownon Wednesday. Photo: Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Hong Kong riot police have fired pepper pellets at activists and surrounded the Legislative Council during demonstrations against a bill proposing to criminalize "disrespect of the Chinese anthem" on Wednesday, per Reuters.

Why it matters: The bill is the latest concern pro-democracy protesters have that Chinese authorities are encroaching on the high degree of autonomy the former British colony has retained since it was returned to China in 1997.

Minneapolis unrest as hundreds protest death of George Floyd

Tear gas is fired as police clash with protesters demonstrating against the death of George Floyd outside the 3rd Precinct Police Precinct in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on Tuesday. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Minneapolis police used tear gas during clashes with protesters demanding justice Tuesday night for George Floyd, an African American who died in police custody, according to multiple news reports.

Driving the news: The FBI is investigating Floyd's death after video emerged of a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on his neck for several minutes, ignoring protests that he couldn't breathe. Hundreds of protesters attended the demonstration at the intersection where Floyd died, per the Guardian.

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced plans Tuesday to make wearing face coverings mandatory statewide for most people over the age of 10 when inside public places like retailers, on public transportation and government buildings. He announced the measure, effective Friday, as coronavirus case numbers increased to 39,342.

By the numbers: More than 98,900 people have died from COVID-19 and over 1.6 million have tested positive in the U.S. Over 384,900 Americans have recovered and more than 14.9 million tests have been conducted.