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Photo: Juanma/UEFA via Getty Images

Lyon beat Wolfsburg, 3-1, in San Sebastian, Spain on Sunday to win the Women's Champions League for an unprecedented fifth time in a row.

Why it matters: Lyon is one of the most dominant teams in sports, winning the past 14 French league titles and averaging an absurd 4.6 goals per game against domestic opponents since 2015.

Star power: U.S. women's national soccer team stars Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan and Hope Solo have all played for Lyon, and 2018 Women's Ballon d'Or winner, Ada Hegerberg, is currently on the team. They're loaded, year in and year out.

The big picture: The gap between Lyon and the rest of the world remains fairly wide, but it's beginning to shrink now that men's powerhouses like Manchester City (just signed USWNT stars Rose Lavelle and Sam Mewis) and Bayern Munich are investing more money in their women's teams.

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Oct 6, 2020 - Economy & Business

Quantifying women's workplace crisis

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

We're starting to see evidence of the coronavirus' erosion of women's workplace gains: 865,000 American women left the labor force in September, compared with 216,000 men.

Why it matters: Many of the women dropping out hold senior-level positions at companies, and their exit from the workforce means the already-abysmal representation of women in leadership at U.S. firms will get even worse.

47 mins ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.