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Image: The National Weather Service in New Orleans

The National Weather Service in New Orleans warned of "life threatening" flash flooding in the region on Saturday night and Sunday morning, as roads were closed and thousands were left without power amid heavy rain in southeast Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas.

Details: The NWS said there's a moderate risk of excessive rainfall on Sunday from southeastern Louisiana, including New Orleans, eastward to southern Georgia. In Mississippi, a train derailed north of Poplarville because of high water levels, WJTV reports. Flash flood warnings were also issued in southeastern Texas as the storm moved out of that waterlogged region.

Why it matters: It is rare that a "high risk" warning for heavy rain is issued, the NWS noted. The moderate risk for Sunday is a category lower, but heavy rains falling on already saturated ground are quickly causing flash flooding.

The big picture: Storms moving eastward across southeast Louisiana left more than 3,000 residents without power, WAFB9 reported. By 6 pm, about 1,200 customers were still without power, according to Entergy.

  • A flash flood warning was issued for New Orleans on Sunday morning, with numerous street closures reported.
  • The same storm system affecting the Gulf Coast has already resulted in severe flooding in Texas.
  • In Houston and Austin — where upward of 6 inches of rain fell late Thursday and early Friday after golf ball-sized hail pelted the region — areas were still experiencing high water conditions on Sunday.
  • The Neches River in east Texas was overflowing, according to the Houston Chronicle.
  • Roads were closed throughout Brazoria County, Texas, which is included in the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land metropolitan statistical area.
  • The past 12 months have been the wettest such period on record in the Lower 48 states.
  • In general, extreme precipitation events such as heavy rainstorms are becoming more frequent and intense as the climate warms in response to human activities, according to Axios science editor Andrew Freedman.

Go deeper: NOAA warns of "unprecedented flood season" across U.S.

Go deeper

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Federal Reserve and global central banks are remaking the world's economy in an effort to save it, but have created something of a monster.

Why it matters: The Fed-driven economy relies on the creation of trillions of dollars — literally out of thin air — that are used to purchase bonds and push money into a pandemic-ravaged economy that has long been dependent on free cash and is only growing more addicted.

Mike Allen, author of AM
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Why Trump may still fire Barr

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Attorney General Barr may be fired or resign, as President Trump seethes about Barr's statement this week that no widespread voter fraud has been found.

Behind the scenes: A source familiar with the president's thinking tells Axios that Trump remains frustrated with what he sees as the lack of a vigorous investigation into his election conspiracy theories.

Mike Allen, author of AM
4 hours ago - World

Scoop: Trump's spy chief plans dire China warning

Xi Jinping reviews troops during a military parade in Beijing last year. Photo: Thomas Peter/Reuters

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe on Thursday will publicly warn that China's threat to the U.S. is a defining issue of our time, a senior administration official tells Axios.

Why it matters: It's exceedingly rare for the head of the U.S. intelligence community to make public accusations about a rival power.