Oct 31, 2019

GOP Rep. Gohmert invokes "civil war" following impeachment vote

Gohmert at a separate meeting of the House Judiciary Committee in July. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images.

Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) gave a House floor speech following the first major vote on impeachment Thursday, calling the measure a "coup" against President Trump and warning of a potential "civil war."

The big picture: The House voted 232-196 on Thursday to formally introduce the impeachment inquiry against President Trump after Republicans said the inquiry is not legitimate because a full House vote had not been held.

  • Republicans have been protesting an alleged lack of transparency in the impeachment process. Gohmert complained that "armed guards" were outside a secure room where depositions were recently held.

What he's saying: "Never in the history of this country have we had such gross unfairness that one party would put armed guards with guns to prevent the duly authorized people from being able to hear the witnesses and see them for themselves," Gohmert stated.

  • “It’s about to push this country to a civil war if they were to get their wishes. And if there’s one thing I don’t want to see in my lifetime, I don’t want to ever have participation in, it’s a civil war. Some historian, I don’t remember who, said, guns are only involved in the last phase of a civil war.”

Reality check: Only members of certain committees are permitted to hear depositions, but those committee are made up of both Republicans and Democrats.

Go deeper: How Democrats and Republicans see impeachment

Go deeper

Updates: George Floyd protests continue past curfews

Protesters on Tuesday evening by the metal fence recently erected outside the White House. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday night across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day — prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: The Army moved 1,600 soldiers from out of state into D.C. area, the Defense Department confirmed in a statement Tuesday. Protesters were still out en masse for mostly after curfews began in cities including Washington, D.C., New York City, Los Angeles and Portland.

Primary elections test impact of protests, coronavirus on voting

Election official at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

Iowa Rep. Steve King defeated in GOP primary

Rep. Steve King. Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

State Sen. Randy Feenstra defeated incumbent Rep. Steve King in Tuesday's Republican primary for Iowa's 4th congressional district, according to the Cook Political Report.

Why it matters: King's history of racist remarks has made him one of the most controversial politicians in the country and a pariah within the Republican Party.