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Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, behind her at left, leave the John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse in Boston on Aug. 27, 2019. Photo: John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

"Full House" actress Lori Loughlin, who became the face of the college admissions bribery scandal, was sentenced to two months in prison on Friday.

The state of play: Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, pleaded guilty earlier this year over their involvement in a scheme to bribe coaches to allow their two children to be admitted into the University of Southern California as fake athletic recruits.

  • Loughlin also must pay a fine of $150,000 and take part in 100 hours of community service.
  • Giannulli was sentenced to five months in federal prison. He will pay a $250,000 fine and serve 250 hours of community service. He will not have to surrender until November.

Go deeper ... Timeline: The major developments in the college admissions scandal

Go deeper

Updated Aug 21, 2020 - Economy & Business

Timeline: The major developments in the college admissions scandal

Lori Loughlin leaves a Boston courthouse in August. Photo: John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In what Department of Justice prosecutors have called the biggest admissions scam in U.S. history, parents allegedly bribed coaches and paid for forged standardized tests in a conspiracy to get their children into elite American colleges.

Driving the news: "Full House" actress Lori Loughlin, one of the biggest names ensnared in the scandal, pleaded guilty on Thursday to related charges and now faces two months in prison.

56 mins ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.