Tributes to the London Bridge terrorist attack victims. Photo: Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto via Getty Images

A vigil was being held Monday morning for the University of Cambridge graduates killed in the London Bridge attack, as police confirmed a 34-year-old man was recalled to prison "on suspicion of preparation of terrorist acts."

Why it matters: Nazam Hussain is the first convicted terrorist to be recalled to prison since British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced Sunday his government was urgently reviewing its sentencing system following Usman Khan's stabbing attack, the Telegraph reports.

Why it matters: Hussain was imprisoned for terrorism offenses in 2012 and was a "close associate" of fellow convicted terrorist Khan, who was killed by police while wearing a fake suicide bombing vest during the stabbing rampage, per the Telegraph. However, Staffordshire Police stressed there's no suggestion that he was involved in Friday's attack.

What's happening: London Mayor Sadiq Khan (no relation to the attacker) was expected to be among those attending the vigil at 11am local time for Jack Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23, who were killed in Friday's attack, the BBC reports. Jones was formally identified as the second attack victim Sunday evening.

Background: The Metropolitan Police said Merritt was the co-ordinator of the Learning Together scheme and Jones was a volunteer for the University of Cambridge program, which was hosting a conference at Fishmongers' Hall from where Khan began his attack.

Go deeper: Queen praises "brave individuals" who wrestled London Bridge attacker

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

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Bob Woodward during a 2019 event in Los Angele. Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images

Journalist Bob Woodward has obtained "25 personal letters exchanged" between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un for his new book, "Rage," publisher Simon & Schuster revealed on Wednesday.

Details: In the letters, "Kim describes the bond between the two leaders as out of a 'fantasy film,' as the two leaders engage in an extraordinary diplomatic minuet," according to a description of the book posted on Amazon.

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A statue of Confederate States President Jefferson Davis lies on the street after protesters pulled it down in Richmond, Virginia, in June. Photo: Parker Michels-Boyce/AFP via Getty Images

59 Confederate symbols have been removed, relocated or renamed since anti-racism protests began over George Floyd's death, a new Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) report finds.

Why it matters: That's a marked increase on previous years, per the report, which points out just 16 Confederate monuments were affected in 2019.