Nov 15, 2018

LinkedIn boosts Microsoft's gender diversity

Ina Fried, author of Login

Photo: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Microsoft reported slight gains in employee diversity on Wednesday, with the representation of women significantly higher than in past reports, thanks to the inclusion of LinkedIn.

By the numbers: With the business network included, Microsoft reported that women made up 28% of staff, up one percentage point.

Yes, but: When you take out LinkedIn and its nearly 43% female staff, Microsoft's gender numbers are less strong, according to data Microsoft provided to Axios.

  • The representation of women for Microsoft’s global workforce increased 1.1 percentage points, from 25.5% to 26.6%, in the last year (from June 30, 2017, to June 30, 2018).  

Microsoft noted that the company has made steady progress when it comes to increasing the number of women in technical and leadership roles.

When it comes to ethnic diversity in the U.S., LinkedIn didn't help Microsoft, as its percentage of Black and Latina/o employees are actually slightly lower than the rest of the company.

  • The percentage of African American/black employees increased slightly to 4.1% (up from 3.9% in June 2017).
  • Similarly, the percentage of Hispanic/Latina/Latino employees also increased to 6.0% (up from 5.8% in June 2017).

Microsoft acknowledged it has more work to do. "We are seeing signs of progress, and some of the seeds planted in prior years are beginning to take root, but we know we have more ahead of us than behind us," Microsoft chief diversity officer Lindsay-Rae McIntyre said in a blog post.

Also: Microsoft changed its reporting period. Last year the company reported annual totals through September. This year the numbers go through the end of June. Microsoft said the change was made to map the report to the company's fiscal year.

Go deeper

Amid racial unrest, a test at the polls

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Eight states plus D.C. are holding primary elections today following a week of intense protests across the country over the brutal police killing of George Floyd.

Why it matters: It's the first major test for voting since the national outcry. Concerns over civil unrest and the police — as well as the coronavirus and expanded absentee voting — could reduce the number of voters showing up in person but heighten tensions for those who do.

Axios-Ipsos poll: America’s big racial divide on police, virus

Data: Ipsos/Axios survey; Note: ±3.2% margin of error; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

A new Axios-Ipsos poll finds that America has a massive racial gulf on each of our twin calamities — trust in police, and fear of the coronavirus.

  • 77% of whites say they trust local police, compared with just 36% of African Americans — one of many measures of a throbbing racial divide in Week 11 of the Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index, taken the week George Floyd was killed by a white policeman in Minneapolis.

Updates: George Floyd protests nationwide

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued for a seventh day across the U.S., with President Trump threatening on Monday to deploy the military if the unrest continues.

The latest: Four police officers were struck by gunfire while standing near a line in St Louis on Monday after a peaceful demonstration, Police Chief John Hayden said early Tuesday. They were all taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries. He said a small group of people had thrown rocks and fireworks at police officers.