Screenshot: Lincoln Project

The Lincoln Project, a group founded by "never Trump" Republicans that has produced some of the cycle's most memorable ads, today begins spending $4 million to blitz Senate races in Alaska, Maine and Montana.

Why it matters: This is the Lincoln Project's biggest buy to date, and the Senate ads will air for seven to 10 days in key markets.

  • The ads — which include "Real" in Alaska and "Strong" in Montana — support challengers to incumbent Republicans.
  • "Trump Stooge," airing in Maine, criticizes Sen. Susan Collins for not standing up to President Trump.
  • "Maine deserves a leader, not a Trump stooge," the ad says.

What they're saying: "We’re moving into the active phase of the fall campaign as voters, stuck at home because of COVID-19, tune in earlier than ever," communications director Keith Edwards told Axios.

See the ads:

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Updated Sep 22, 2020 - Politics & Policy

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