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Rainbow flags at New York City's Rockefeller Center on June 26. Photo: Gotham/Getty Images

After in-person celebrations for the 50th anniversary of New York City's annual pride parade were canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic, a march focused on the Black Lives Matter movement will take its place on Sunday.

Why it matters: New York's annual parade honors the first gay rights march in U.S. history, which started in 1970 to commemorate the Stonewall riots.

Catch up quick: NYCPride will livestream events to celebrate the parade Sunday at noon, as the Queer Liberation March for Black Lives — which says it has eschewed corporate funding and police participation — will also be held Sunday.

  • Participants in the march are encouraged to wear face masks and social distance.
  • The Queer Liberation march had originally cancelled its Sunday event, but organizers reversed the decision after George Floyd's killing, the New Yorker's Michael Schulman reports.

The big picture: Many Black Lives Matter protests have made it a point to call for justice for Black transgender people, who are on the receiving end of an inordinate amount of violence and discrimination.

Go deeper: A Radical Challenger to New York City’s Pride March (The New Yorker)

Go deeper

Several vessels sink at Trump boat parade on Texas lake

Officers responded to "multiple calls involving boats in distress during the Trump parade" on Lake Travis in Texas Saturday, Travis County Sheriff's Office said, adding, "Several boats did sink."

The big picture: A sheriff’s office spokesperson noted there were no adverse weather conditions and no foul play was suspected, but an investigation into the incident had begun, per AP. It was one of several boat rallies in the U.S. supporting President Trump Saturday. Chris Molla, who organized a New Jersey event supporting police officers, veterans and Trump, told Fox News they hoped to break the Guinness World Record for the largest boat parade.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Inhofe loudly sets Trump straight on defense bill

Sen. Jim Inhofe speaks with reporters in the Capitol last month. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Jim Inhofe told President Trump today he'll likely fail to get two big wishes in pending defense spending legislation, bellowing into his cellphone: "This is the only chance to get our bill passed," a source who overheard part of their conversation tells Axios.

Why it matters: Republicans are ready to test whether Trump's threats of vetoing the bill, which has passed every year for more than half a century, are empty.

Conspiracy theories blow back on Trump's White House

Sidney Powell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

President Trump has rarely met a conspiracy theory he doesn't like, but he and other Republicans now worry the wild tales told by lawyers Sidney Powell and Lin Wood may cost them in Georgia's Senate special elections.

Why it matters: The two are telling Georgians not to vote for Republicans David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler because of a bizarre, baseless and potentially self-defeating theory: It's not worth voting because the Chinese Communist Party has rigged the voting machines.