Photo: Andrew Toth/FilmMagic via Getty Images

Former CBS chairman and CEO Les Moonves has told CBS' board that he intends to dispute its ruling to strip him of his $120 million severance after he was fired with cause, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The network pulled the payment after an internal investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct.

Why it matters: Sources at CBS and within the industry say that Moonves' ego ultimately prevented a more graceful exit at CBS. His reluctance to step down after initial reports about his behavior, his attempts to undermine investigations, and his current fight to keep his money all highlight the extent to which he is willing to fight these allegations at the expense of his reputation.

Be smart: At the time of his firing, Moonves' lawyers said that he "vehemently denies" any reports of non-consensual sexual relations — and that he was cooperating with investigators. That, combined with the fact that CBS has been paying Moonves' legal fees since he was fired in September, make the legal action less surprising but aggressive nonetheless.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 31,120,980 — Total deaths: 961,656— Total recoveries: 21,287,328Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 6,819,651 — Total deaths: 199,606 — Total recoveries: 2,590,671 — Total tests: 95,108,559Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  5. Business: Unemployment concerns are growing.
  6. World: "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.

House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Democrats on Monday released their proposal for short-term legislation to fund the government through December 11.

Why it matters: This is Congress' chief legislative focus before the election. They must pass a continuing resolution (CR) before midnight on Oct. 1 to avoid a government shutdown — something both Hill leaders and the White House have claimed is off the table.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state in Capitol's National Statuary Hall

Photo: Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Monday that the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state in the Capitol's National Statuary Hall on Friday, making Ginsburg the first woman to ever receive the honor.

The state of play: The Supreme Court also announced Monday that Ginsburg will lie in repose on the front steps of the building on Wednesday and Thursday, allowing the public to pay respects to the late justice outside.