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Photo: Adam Jeffery/CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

CBS Corporation announced Sunday night that longtime leader Les Moonves will depart as chairman, president, and CEO. The announcement comes just hours after a second Ronan Farrow report in The New Yorker in which six more women alleged sexual misconduct by the television veteran.

Why it matters: Moonves is one of the most high-profile executives to be brought down by the #MeToo movement. His departure comes after weeks of inaction from CBS' board, which had drawn a great deal of criticism from advocacy groups.

The details:

  • The replacement: CBS COO Joe Ianniello will now serve as president and acting CEO, something insiders have long anticipated.
  • Board shakeup: CBS is getting rid of six board members, who voted to dilute its parent company shares, and is adding six new board members, including three women.
  • The terms: CBS also announced a settlement to end its legal battle with majority shareholder Shari Redstone and her holding company National Amusements Inc. NAI reaffirmed its previous position that it won't continue to push CBS to merge with its former sister company Viacom.
  • No payday: Moonves has been stripped of his $100 million-plus severance package due to the allegations. In a statement, Moonves and CBS said that they will donate $20 million of Moonves' severance to advocacy groups who support the #MeToo movement.

Go deeper: New Moonves accusations prompt reports of his imminent departure.

Go deeper

Salesforce rolls the dice on Slack

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Salesforce's likely acquisition of workplace messaging service Slack — not yet a done deal but widely anticipated to be announced Tuesday afternoon — represents a big gamble for everyone involved.

For Slack, challenged by competition from Microsoft, the bet is that a deeper-pocketed owner like Salesforce, with wide experience selling into large companies, will help the bottom line.

FBI stats show border cities are among the safest

Data: FBI, Kansas Bureau of Investigation; Note: This table includes the eight largest communities on the U.S.-Mexico border and eight other U.S. cities similar in population size and demographics; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

U.S. communities along the Mexico border are among the safest in America, with some border cities holding crime rates well below the national average, FBI statistics show.

Why it matters: The latest crime data collected by the FBI from 2019 contradicts the narrative by President Trump and others that the U.S.-Mexico border is a "lawless" region suffering from violence and mayhem.

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
2 hours ago - Science

The rise of military space powers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Nations around the world are shoring up their defensive and offensive capabilities in space — for today's wars and tomorrow's.

Why it matters: Using space as a warfighting domain opens up new avenues for technologically advanced nations to dominate their enemies. But it can also make those countries more vulnerable to attack in novel ways.