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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee is staffing up as it works to finish its investigation into the competitive impact of tech giants.

Why it matters: The House probe's findings will help shape legislation that may aim to toughen antitrust law for the digital era, and they could offer fuel for similar investigations already under way by state and federal antitrust enforcers.

Driving the news: The antitrust panel has brought on two new staffers in recent months as it wades through documents from Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google in the competition review.

  • Former IBM consultant Anna Lenhart, a Congressional Innovation Fellow, joined the staff this month as a technical expert, a person familiar with the hire told Axios. Lenhart, a Carnegie Mellon graduate, most recently focused on artificial intelligence and ethics for IBM.
  • Former Public Knowledge policy director Phillip Berenbroick joined the subcommittee as counsel in January.

What's next: Antitrust subcommittee Chairman David Cicilline has said he expects the investigation to produce a bipartisan report outlining its findings by the end of the first quarter. He also intends to introduce legislation related to the report.

  • Cicilline has said he wants to hear from major tech company CEOs, something the White House has also encouraged, according to a recent report by The Hill.

Go deeper

Big Tech's post-riot reckoning

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Capitol insurrection means the anti-tech talk in Washington is more likely to lead to action, since it's ever clearer that the attack was planned, at least in part, on social media.

Why it matters: The big platforms may have hoped they'd move to D.C.'s back burner, with the Hill focused on the Biden agenda and the pandemic out of control. But now, there'll be no escaping harsh scrutiny.

10 mins ago - Technology

Why domestic terrorists are so hard to police online

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Domestic terrorism has proven to be more difficult for Big Tech companies to police online than foreign terrorism.

The big picture: That's largely because the politics are harder. There's more unity around the need to go after foreign extremists than domestic ones — and less danger of overreaching and provoking a backlash.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
15 mins ago - Economy & Business

Work-wherever turns to work-whenever

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic killed the 9-to-5 workday for many.

The big picture: So much of our society — from after-school child care programs to the most coveted time slots for television shows — is structured around working from 9 to 5. But our countrywide experiment in remote work has demonstrated that the hours we are logged on don't matter as long as the work gets done.