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Reproduced from Student Player; Cartogram: Axios Visuals

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) introduced a bill on Thursday that would require the NCAA to change its rules by June 2021 regarding athletes' ability to profit off their name, image and likeness (NIL), while also protecting the NCAA from legal challenges to the new regulations.

The big picture: The NCAA is fearful that state-by-state action will lead to competitive unbalance and chaos and is hoping to work with Congress on passing national legislation, so they predictably endorsed Rubio's bill.

What they're saying: "We can't have 50 separate laws. It will destroy college athletics," Rubio said in a video posted to Twitter.

The backdrop: The bill comes six days after Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis passed a law that will allow athletes in the state to profit off their NIL starting in July 2021. California and Colorado passed similar laws that go into effect in 2023.

The other side: Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) said he's glad Rubio introduced legislation, but Murphy cautioned against putting too much emphasis on the interest of the NCAA and placing the fate of endorsement deals in their hands.

What's next: There is already a bill in Congress on this topic from Rep. Mark Walker (R.-N.C.), and there is another one coming in the next few weeks from Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (R-Ohio). It's a mess — but the tide is turning.

Go deeper

Rubio: Senate Intel Committee will continue to get election briefings in person

Sen. Marco Rubio. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Acting Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) said the committee will still receive in-person briefings on election-security issues, despite a recent directive from the Trump administration barring them, Politico reports.

Driving the news: Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe informed congressional committees at the end of August that in-person briefings covering election security will no longer take place and lawmakers will instead receive written intelligence reports. Democrats say that suspending in-person briefings will allow Ratcliffe to skirt accountability and avoid questions.

Janet Yellen is back

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Hannelore Foerster/Getty Images

A face familiar to Wall Street is back as a central player that this time will need to steer the country out of a deep economic crisis.

Driving the news: President-elect Joe Biden is preparing to nominate former Fed chair Janet Yellen to be Treasury secretary.

Mike Allen, author of AM
35 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Charles Koch: "I screwed up"

In his first on-camera interview in four years, Charles Koch told "Axios on HBO" that he "screwed up by being partisan," rather than approaching his network's big-spending political action in a more nonpartisan way.

Why it matters: Koch — chairman and CEO of Koch Industries, which Forbes yesterday designated as America's largest private company — has been the left's favorite face of big-spending political action.

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