Aug 28, 2018

Kudlow: Trump administration "taking a look" at regulating Google

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Larry Kudlow, President Trump's chief economic adviser, told reporters outside of the White House this morning that the administration is "taking a look" at whether Google searches should be subject to government regulation, per The Washington Post.

The big picture: Kudlow's statement joins a controversial pair of tweets by President Trump this morning, adding high drama to a joint Capitol Hill appearance next week by Facebook, Google and Twitter.

  • "Google & others are suppressing voices of Conservatives and hiding information and news that is good," Trump tweeted.
  • "They are controlling what we can & cannot see. This is a very serious situation-will be addressed!"

In a 5:24 a.m. wake-up call for Big Tech, Trump began:

  • "Google search results for 'Trump News' shows only the viewing/reporting of Fake New Media. In other words, they have it RIGGED, for me & others, so that almost all stories & news is BAD. Fake CNN is prominent. Republican/Conservative & Fair Media is shut out. Illegal?"
  • "96% of ... results on 'Trump News' are from National Left-Wing Media, very dangerous."

What spurred the tweet: Trump's tirade appears to stem from a PJ Media article titled, "96 Percent of Google Search Results for 'Trump' News Are from Liberal Media Outlets," which was covered last night by Fox Business' Lou Dobbs.

  • In a test that she admitted was "not scientific," PJ Media editor Paula Bolyward Googled the word "Trump" and classified each result based on a media chart compiled by right-leaning Sinclair Broadcast Group anchor Sharyl Atkisson.

Be smart: Trump has been whacking social media, on social media, to shift next week's hearings to how he’s a victim of social media.

Big Tech testifies a week from tomorrow (Sept. 5) about censorship and election interference.

  • The platforms are better prepared than they were for a joint appearance a year ago, Axios' Sara Fischer writes.
  • The companies are bringing in higher level witnesses: Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg is coming, and Twitter will send CEO Jack Dorsey. Google so far has offered SVP and general counsel Kent Walker, which Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard Burr rejected.

Go deeper: Tracing Trump's Google censorship tweet

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The cost of going after Bloomberg

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Here's the growing dilemma for 2020 Democrats vying for a one-on-one showdown with frontrunner Bernie Sanders: Do they have the guts — and the money — to first stop Mike Bloomberg?

Why it matters: Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren all must weigh the costs of punching Bloomberg where he looks most vulnerable: stop-and-frisk, charges of sexism, billionaire entitlement. The more zealous the attacks, the greater the risk he turns his campaign ATM against them.

How Trump’s economy stacks up

Source: "Presidents and US Economy", Trump figures through 2019 courtesy of Alan Blinder; Note: Data shows real GDP and Q1 growth in each term is attributed to the previous president; Chart: Axios Visuals

Average economic growth under President Trump has outpaced the growth under Barack Obama, but not all of his recent predecessors.

Why it matters: GDP is the most comprehensive economic scorecard — and something presidents, especially Trump, use as an example of success. And it's especially relevant since Trump is running for re-election on his economic record.

Coronavirus cases rise as 14 American evacuees infected

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's NHC; Note: China refers to mainland China and the Diamond Princess is the cruise ship offshore Yokohama, Japan. Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

14 Americans evacuated from the Diamond Princess cruise ship tested positive for the novel coronavirus before being flown in a "specialist containment" on a plane repatriating U.S. citizens back home, the U.S. government said early Monday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 1,770 people and infected almost 70,000 others. Most cases and all but five of the deaths have occurred in mainland China. Taiwan confirmed its first death on Sunday, per multiple reports, in a 61-year-old man with underlying health conditions. Health officials were investigating how he became ill.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 5 hours ago - Health