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Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Larry Kudlow, President Trump's chief economic adviser, told reporters outside of the White House this morning that the administration is "taking a look" at whether Google searches should be subject to government regulation, per The Washington Post.

The big picture: Kudlow's statement joins a controversial pair of tweets by President Trump this morning, adding high drama to a joint Capitol Hill appearance next week by Facebook, Google and Twitter.

  • "Google & others are suppressing voices of Conservatives and hiding information and news that is good," Trump tweeted.
  • "They are controlling what we can & cannot see. This is a very serious situation-will be addressed!"

In a 5:24 a.m. wake-up call for Big Tech, Trump began:

  • "Google search results for 'Trump News' shows only the viewing/reporting of Fake New Media. In other words, they have it RIGGED, for me & others, so that almost all stories & news is BAD. Fake CNN is prominent. Republican/Conservative & Fair Media is shut out. Illegal?"
  • "96% of ... results on 'Trump News' are from National Left-Wing Media, very dangerous."

What spurred the tweet: Trump's tirade appears to stem from a PJ Media article titled, "96 Percent of Google Search Results for 'Trump' News Are from Liberal Media Outlets," which was covered last night by Fox Business' Lou Dobbs.

  • In a test that she admitted was "not scientific," PJ Media editor Paula Bolyward Googled the word "Trump" and classified each result based on a media chart compiled by right-leaning Sinclair Broadcast Group anchor Sharyl Atkisson.

Be smart: Trump has been whacking social media, on social media, to shift next week's hearings to how he’s a victim of social media.

Big Tech testifies a week from tomorrow (Sept. 5) about censorship and election interference.

  • The platforms are better prepared than they were for a joint appearance a year ago, Axios' Sara Fischer writes.
  • The companies are bringing in higher level witnesses: Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg is coming, and Twitter will send CEO Jack Dorsey. Google so far has offered SVP and general counsel Kent Walker, which Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard Burr rejected.

Go deeper: Tracing Trump's Google censorship tweet

Go deeper

The perils of organizing underground

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Researchers see one bright spot as far-right extremists turn to private and encrypted online platforms: Friction.

Between the lines: For fringe organizers, those platforms may provide more security than open social networks, but they make it harder to recruit new members.

Resurrecting Martin Luther King's office

King points to Selma, Alabama on a map at his Southern Christian Leadership Conference office in Atlanta in January 1965. Photo: Bettmann/Getty Contributor

Efforts to save the office where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned some of the most important moments of the civil rights movement are hitting roadblocks amid a political stalemate.

Why it matters: The U.S. Park Service needs to OK agreements so a developer restoring the historic Prince Hall Masonic Lodge in Atlanta — which once housed King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference — can tap into private funding and begin work.

Off the Rails

Episode 4: Trump turns on Barr

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Drew Angerer, Pool/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 4: Trump torches what is arguably the most consequential relationship in his Cabinet.

Attorney General Bill Barr stood behind a chair in the private dining room next to the Oval Office, looming over Donald Trump. The president sat at the head of the table. It was Dec. 1, nearly a month after the election, and Barr had some sharp advice to get off his chest. The president's theories about a stolen election, Barr told Trump, were "bullshit."

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