Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With almost all U.S. states closing schools until at least the end of the month, most children ages 6–12 say they are spending at least 50% more time in front of screens daily, according to new data from SuperAwesome, a kids technology company.

Why it matters: Parents were already struggling to limit screen time for kids when they were in school, let alone trying to pull them away from their devices while they are forced to stay home away from their friends, peers and regular activities.

Driving the news: In the U.S., a majority of 6–12 year-olds say they use screen devices either a lot more (at least 50% more), twice as much, or for what feels like "most of the day" during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • "Overall, kids are effectively going to be spending 2.5–3x more hours of day in front of a digital screen than they historically would have," says Dylan Collins, CEO of SuperAwesome.
  • "What we were seeing is that U.K. kids had a slightly higher tendency to do more family-based stuff, as in physical family activity, like board games and table top games, than U.S. kids who spend more time with screens," says Collins.
Expand chart
Data: Super Awesome ; Chart: Axios Visuals

Details: Traffic to kids apps and digital services has increased by nearly 70% in the U.S., per the report.

  • "You're seeing a slight increase in desktop, largely because of school demands," says Collins. "A lot of families in a normal routine would have a single tablet shared between siblings, but because homeschooling needs to have consistent access to devices across multiple kids, you're seeing desktop spike."
  • Tablet traffic has nearly tripled, while phone traffic has nearly doubled. Assuming some children don't yet own their own devices, especially phones, the data is likely a reflection of children using their parents' devices to access kids sites.
  • Connected TV device usage is much higher in the U.S. than in the U.K. Connected TV usage seems to have leveled off over the past week or so, as more schools have begun to formally implement remote work and are back from spring break.
  • Overall, traffic to kids sites and apps in the U.S. is much higher than in the U.K., per the report.

Gender split data shows that girls over the past few weeks have typically used chat apps and TikTok more than boys and have read more. Boys on the other hand, have weighted much more heavily towards gaming.

  • Digital engagement between genders is also increasing, as children try to make up for the lack of in-person contact at school.

Be smart: It's easy for parents to blame phones and tablets for an increase in digital engagement, but most kids say they are spending more time watching content on the TV screen than anything else.

  • Of the activities that kids say they are spending more time doing, streaming video tops the list across all ages of kids 6–12+, followed by watching regular TV, then playing games.
  • When it comes to streaming, the top brands that kids say they are engaging with are Netflix, followed by Amazon, YouTube, Apple and Disney+.
  • The data compliments figures out last week from Digiday that show that the total day viewing of many of the largest children's TV networks, like The Cartoon Network, Disney Channel and Nickelodeon, have experienced massive upswings.

Yes, but: Levels of increased screen time can actually be a reflection of healthy engagement too, says Collins.

  • "The phenomenon of physical play being translated into a digital forum is something that we're just beginning to see, and it's hard to know exactly how that plays out in then next few months."
  • "You see it coming out of the parents' data that kids are starting to feel lonely and are missing friends. The next big question is, how do parents translate regular play into digital activity?"

The bottom line: For many parents who are forced to simultaneously balance child supervision and working at home, screen time limits have effectively been out of the picture.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Dems' immigration plan hits major roadblock

Senate Majority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Senate parliamentarian ruled Sunday that Democrats cannot include pathways to citizenship in the $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package, per a copy of the ruling obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: It's a blow to Democrats who hoped to provide pathways for millions of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. Using reconciliations would have allowed them to pass politically contentious immigration changes with only 50 votes, as opposed to the usual 60 required.

FBI says human remains found in Wyoming likely Gabby Petito

Gabby Petito. Photo: FBI

Human remains found in Teton County, Wyoming, are "consistent with the description of" missing 22-year-old Gabby Petito, said FBI Denver official Charles Jones at a news conference Sunday.

Details: The cause of death had yet to be determined, but Jones said: "Full forensic identification has not been completed to confirm 100% that we found Gabby, but her family has been notified of this discovery." Authorities said they're continuing the search for her fiancé, Brian Laundrie.

Pelosi calls raising the debt ceiling a bipartisan responsibility

Photo: Samuel Corum/Bloomberg via Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) issued a "dear colleague" statement Sunday evening, calling on Congress to act in a bipartisan manner to raise the nation's debt ceiling.

Why it matters: Congress is fast approaching an October deadline to raise the nation's debt ceiling and avoid a government shutdown. But the issue has become a thorny partisan stand-off.