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Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump spoke with reporters on Thanksgiving morning and hit on hot topics like border security and his relationship with Saudi Arabia.

One key quote: When discussing his reaffirmed commitment to Saudi Arabia: "[T]hey’re putting up tremendous amounts of money to fight terrorism. Now, they were part of terrorism and nobody is going to try and justify that. They were a big part of it. But they’re spending a lot of money and they’re opening up and they’re doing a lot of things."

  • On Khashoggi's murder: "I hate the crime, I hate what’s done, I hate the cover up. And I will tell you this the crown prince hates it more than I do and they have vehemently denied it. The CIA points it both ways, you know, and as I said, maybe he did maybe he didn’t. But I will say very strongly that they’re a very important ally, and if we go by a certain standard, we won’t be able to have allies with almost any country."
  • On reaffirming support to Saudi Arabia: "Saudi Arabia has been a longtime strategic partner. They’re investing hundreds of billions of dollars in our country. I mean, hundreds of billions. They’re keeping the oil prices low. ... But very importantly, they’re investing billions of dollars, they’re buying their equipment from us. And remember this: they don’t have to buy from us."
  • On the caravan: "There are many criminals in that caravan, and the big caravan hasn’t arrived yet. And we’re well fortified, we have fencing and walls like very few people have. ... We need workers. But they have to come in legally.  We want them to come in. But they have to be people that want to work and want to do a great job for our country. They come in through a merit system."
  • On authorizing the use of lethal force against migrants: "If they have to, I hope they don’t have to, but you know, you’re dealing with a minimum of 500 serious criminals. So I’m not going to let the military be taken advantage of. I have no choice."
  • On closing the border: "[I]f we find that it gets to a level where we lose control or people are going to start getting hurt, we’re going to close entry into the country for a period of time until we get it under control."
  • On his meeting with China's President Xi: "I’m very prepared, I’ve been preparing for it all my life. It’s not like, oh gee, I’m going to sit down and study it. I know every detail. I know every stat, I know it better than anyone who’s ever known it and my gut has always been right."
  • On Ivanka's emails: "Very innocent, short period of time, early on. There was no deletion of emails like the 33,000, probably another 100,000 that Hillary Clinton did after she got the subpoenas. There was no bleached bit. There was no anything, just innocent emails, no classified emails, a much different deal. Another fake news story."
  • On visiting troops in Afghanistan: “We’re going to do some interesting things. We’ll be doing some very interesting things.”

One Thanksgiving thing: Trump said he's grateful for "[g]reat family, and for having made a tremendous difference in this country. I made a tremendous difference in this country. This country is so much stronger now than it was when I took office and you wouldn’t believe it...We’ve made a lot of progress."

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Biden taps Brian Deese to lead National Economic Council

Brian Deese (L) in 2015 with special envoy for climate change Todd Stern (C) and Secretary of State John Kerry (R). Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden announced Thursday that he has selected Brian Deese, a former Obama climate aide and head of sustainable investing at BlackRock, to serve as director of the National Economic Council.

Why it matters: The influential position does not require Senate confirmation, but Deese's time working for BlackRock, the world's largest asset manager and an investor in fossil fuels, has made him a target of criticism from progressives.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
33 mins ago - Economy & Business

The places regulation does not reach

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Financial regulation is not exactly simple anywhere in the world. But one country stands out for the sheer amount of complexity and confusion in its regulatory regime — the U.S.

Why it matters: Important companies fall through the cracks, largely unregulated, while others contend with a vast array of regulatory bodies, none of which are remotely predictable.

1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Boeing gets huge 737 Max order from Ryanair, boosting hope for quick rebound

Ryanair low cost airline Boeing 737-800 aircraft as seen over the runway. Photo by Nik Oiko/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Dublin-based Ryanair said it would add 75 more planes to an existing order for Boeing's 737 Max airplanes, a giant vote of confidence as Boeing seeks to revive sales of its best-selling plane after a 20-month safety ban following two fatal crashes.

The big picture: Ryanair's big order, on the heels of breakthrough vaccine news, is also a promising sign that the devastated airline industry might recover from the global pandemic sooner than expected.