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Carolyn Kaster / AP

Kellyanne Conway was overheard making fun of fellow White House colleagues and discussing West Wing matters to reporters during a party at the British Embassy in D.C. last Thursday, Politico Playbook reported. This challenges what she told Mike Allen on June 7 during our Axios News Shapers event, when she suggested that everyone in the WH gets along and that no one is really in the doghouse.

What Conway said, per Playbook:

  • She was overheard mocking WH Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and his efforts to stop leaks: "No leaks guuuys," she said, according to a source who started a "Kellyanne Leaks" Twitter account during that event.
  • "He should just be honest: 'I'm upset because there's someone working on a story who pronounces it RAYNSE instead of REINCE.'"
  • She questioned out loud what Legislative Director Marc Short does all day as part of his job. "Honestly, what... does Marc Short do all day?" she asked, according to the source behind the Twitter account.
  • And Conway said she is "the one catching the slings and arrows in the West Wing."

Damage control: Conway denied the claims about Short, according to Sean Spicer who spoke with Politico. And Spicer said that Conway wasn't making fun of Priebus — he claimed she was mocking reporters "and how wrong they've been" about WH stories.

Go deeper

38 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's latest executive order: Buy American

President Joe R. Biden speaks about the economy before signing executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Friday, Jan 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden will continue his flurry of executive orders on Monday, signing a new directive to require the federal government to “buy American” for products and services.

Why it matters: The executive action is yet another attempt by Biden to accomplish goals administratively without waiting for the backing of Congress. The new order echoes Biden's $400 billion campaign pledge to increase government purchases of American goods.

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.

The pandemic could be worsening childhood obesity

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The 10-month long school closures and the coronavirus pandemic are expected to have a big impact on childhood obesity rates.

Why it matters: About one in five children are obese in the U.S. — an all-time high — with worsening obesity rates across income and racial and ethnic groups, data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey show.

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