Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Senate voted 56 to 38 on Tuesday to confirm Kelly Craft to represent the U.S. at the UN General Assembly meeting this month.

Why it matters: Craft was confirmed as U.S. ambassador to the UN in July, ending a months-long vacancy for the position after Nikki Haley stepped down at the end of 2018. Craft, who previously served as the U.S. ambassador to Canada and was a high-profile GOP donor in Kentucky, was recommended for the position by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Go deeper: Trump’s incredibly empty Cabinet

Editor's note: This post has been corrected to reflect that today's vote was to confirm Craft as the U.S. representative to the UN General Assembly meeting.

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
46 mins ago - Economy & Business

CEO confidence skyrockets on expectations of layoffs and wage cuts

U.S. consumers remain uncertain about the economic environment but CEOs are feeling incredibly confident, the latest survey from the Conference Board shows.

Why it matters: Confidence among chief executives jumped 19 points from its last reading in July, rising above the 50-point threshold that reflects more positive than negative responses for the first time since 2018.

Louisville officer: "Breonna Taylor would be alive" if we had served no-knock warrant

Breonna Taylor memorial in Louisville. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, the Louisville officer who led the botched police raid that caused the death of Breonna Taylor, said the No. 1 thing he wishes he had done differently is either served a "no-knock" warrant or given five to 10 seconds before entering the apartment: "Breonna Taylor would be alive, 100 percent."

Driving the news: Mattingly, who spoke to ABC News and Louisville's Courier Journal for his public interview, was shot in the leg in the initial moments of the March 13 raid. Mattingly did not face any charges after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said he and another officer were "justified" in returning fire to protect themselves against Taylor's boyfriend.

U.S. vs. Google — the siege begins

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Justice Department fired the starter pistol on what's likely to be a years-long legal siege of Big Tech by the U.S. government when it filed a major antitrust suit Tuesday against Google.

The big picture: Once a generation, it seems, federal regulators decide to take on a dominant tech company. Two decades ago, Microsoft was the target; two decades before that, IBM.