Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said on Monday that she has tested positive for the coronavirus after displaying no symptoms.

Why it matters: Bottoms, one of several Black women on the shortlist to be Joe Biden's running mate, has risen to national prominence in recent months as part of mass protests over racism and police brutality — driven in part by the killing of Rayshard Brooks by Atlanta police.

The big picture: Single-day coronavirus infections in Georgia reached a new high last Wednesday, with nearly 3,000 new cases reported. The state has reported more than 97,000 confirmed cases in total and over 2,800 deaths, per state health department data.

What she's saying: "It leaves me for a loss of words because I think it really speaks to how contagious this virus is, and we've taken all of the precautions that you can possibly take. We wear masks, we are very thoughtful about washing our hands. I have no idea when and where we were exposed," Bottoms told MSNBC on Monday.

  • "I'm processing this, all of this. I just received my results. My husband literally has been sleeping since Thursday, which is just not like him, so I decided that we should all get tested again."
  • "We were tested about two weeks ago, we were all negative. And our results came back positive today, and it's a shock, because what I've seen with him is not out of the ordinary for seasonal allergies which are just about year-round allergies in Atlanta."
  • Bottoms said she had been suffering from a mild cough and a headache, which she attributed to allergies.

Go deeper: Bottoms tears into Trump for hosting rally during pandemic

Go deeper

Updated Oct 14, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trumpworld coronavirus tracker

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

An outbreak of COVID-19 has struck the White House — including the president himself — just weeks before the 2020 election.

Why it matters: If the president can get infected, anyone can. And the scramble to figure out the scope of this outbreak is a high-profile, high-stakes microcosm of America's larger failures to contain the virus and to stand up a contact-tracing system that can respond to new cases before they have a chance to become outbreaks.

Black Americans are more skeptical of a coronavirus vaccine

Data: KFF; Chart: Axios Visuals

Strikingly large shares of Black Americans say they would be reluctant to get a coronavirus vaccine — even if it was free and had been deemed safe by scientists, according to a new nationwide survey from KFF and The Undefeated.

Why it matters: The findings reflect well-founded distrust of government and health care institutions, and they underscore the need for credible outreach efforts when a vaccine is distributed. Otherwise, distribution could fail to effectively reach the Black community, which has been disproportionately affected by coronavirus.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Oct 13, 2020 - Health

The stubbornly high coronavirus death rate

Reproduced from Bilinski, et al., 2020, "COVID-19 and Excess All-Cause Mortality in the US and 18 Comparison Countries"; Note: The units in the chart were corrected to show the deaths are per 100,000 people (not deaths per one million people.); Chart: Axios Visuals

Although other wealthy countries have higher overall coronavirus mortality rates than the United States, the U.S. death rate since May is unrivaled among its peers, according to a new study published in JAMA.

Between the lines: After the first brutal wave of outbreaks, other countries did much better than the U.S. at learning from their mistakes and preventing more of their population from dying.