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Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Kanye West's decision to tweet his support for President Trump in April was equal parts freeing and anxiety-inducing for the rap star, according to a worthy-of-your-time profile by The New York Times' Jon Caramanica.

The big picture: Kanye's discussion of the fallout from his support is indicative of the phenomenon illustrated by Axios' Jim VandeHei and Mike Allen: As today's political climate grows more tribal, casual viewers of politics feel drawn to Trump's straight-talking style, remaining disconnected from or dismissive of handwringing over his policies and destruction of norms.

On his decision to tweet his support for Trump:

  • "I felt that I knew people who voted for Trump that were celebrities that were scared to say that they liked him. But they told me, and I liked him, and I’m not scared to say what I like. 'Let me come over here and get in this fight with you.'"
  • "No, I don’t agree with all of his policies."
  • "[My father] expressed that he felt that some of the policies were hurtful and that I’m a person that does not intend to hurt people, never hurts people with intention. I expressed the example that I have a cousin that’s locked up for doing something bad, and I still love him, so I don’t base my love for a person on if they doing something good or bad."

On his decision to speak out as a black celebrity:

  • "I believe that I’m actually a better father because I got my [expletive] voice back, I’m a better artist because I got my voice back. I was living inside of some universe that was created by the mob-thought, and I had lost who I was, so that’s when I was in the sunken place. You look in my eyes right now — you see no sunken place."
  • "Having a political opinion that’s overly informed, it’s like knowing how to dress, as opposed to being a child — 'I like this.' I hear Trump talk and I’m like, I like the way it sounds, knowing that there’s people who like me that don’t like the way it sounds."

What they're saying: Sen. Marco Rubio, discussing the recent trend of public shaming Trump officials by protestors, also touched on a sentiment similar to Kanye's — in a tweet retweeted by Trump himself.

The bottom line: Kanye's focus on Trump's style rather than the nitty-gritty of his politics matches what a White House administration official told Mike back in April, just after Kanye's initial tweetstorm: "He genuinely moves the culture. And we all know DJT believes — correctly — that culture matters way more than politics."

Go deeper: Trump's winning, cynical plan

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release."
  2. Politics: McConnell temporarily halts in-person lunches for GOP caucus.
  3. Economy: Safety nets to disappear in DecemberAmazon hires 1,400 workers a day throughout pandemic.
  4. Education: U.S. public school enrollment drops as pandemic persists.
  5. Cities: Surge in cases forces San Francisco to impose curfew — Los Angeles County issues stay-at-home order, limits gatherings.
  6. Sports: NFL bans in-person team activities Monday, Tuesday due to COVID-19 surge — NBA announces new coronavirus protocols.
  7. World: London police arrest more than 150 during anti-lockdown protests — Thailand, Philippines sign deal with AstraZeneca for vaccine.

Tony Hsieh, longtime Zappos CEO, dies at 46

Tony Hsieh. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic

Tony Hsieh, the longtime ex-chief executive of Zappos, died on Friday after being injured in a house fire, his lawyer told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. He was 46.

The big picture: Hsieh was known for his unique approach to management, and following the 2008 recession his ongoing investment and efforts to revitalize the downtown Las Vegas area.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
15 hours ago - Economy & Business

The unicorn stampede is coming

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Airbnb and DoorDash plan to go public in the next few weeks, capping off a very busy year for IPOs.

What's next: You ain't seen nothing yet.