Dec 19, 2019

Kamala Harris accuses Mitch McConnell of seeking Senate cover-up

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris wrote in a New York Times op-ed Wednesday that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell "wants a Senate cover-up," as she pushed for acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney and former national security adviser John Bolton to testify at the Senate trial.

"He is already trying to limit the impeachment trial by preventing witnesses from testifying, and he has all but announced a verdict. In doing so, he showed the American people that he has no intention of honoring his oath."
— Excerpt from Kamala Harris' New York Times op-ed

Context: McConnell has dismissed Democrats' calls for witnesses including Mulvaney and Bolton to testify in the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump because he said it's the House's "duty to investigate," and the Senate will not volunteer its time for a "fishing expedition."

What she's saying: "We need to hear from Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff, who admitted to Mr. Trump’s bribery scheme on live television, and from the former national security adviser, John Bolton, who has been shopping stories about Mr. Trump to book publishers instead of speaking with Congress," Harris wrote in the op-ed.

"Every senator should want to hear from anyone who can speak directly to the president’s misconduct related to the articles of impeachment."

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Editor's note: This article has been updated following the House impeachment vote to reflect that the Senate trial is now set to go ahead.

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Sen. Roy Blunt: Impeachment trial is "not a trial in any classic sense"

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) told CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that the upcoming Senate impeachment trial is "not a trial in any classic sense," noting that there are senators running for the Democratic presidential nomination and that every member has "obvious" political considerations.

Go deeperArrowDec 22, 2019

What they're saying: Romney, Collins respond to Bolton's offer to testify

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Responses rolled in Monday from top congressional leaders and key Republican senators on former national security adviser John Bolton's announcement that he would willingly testify in the Senate's impeachment trial if issued a subpoena.

Driving the news: Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) told reporters he "would like to be able to hear from John Bolton," but added: "What the process is to make that happen, I don’t have an answer for you."

Go deeperArrowJan 6, 2020

Schumer argues for White House document production before Trump impeachment trial

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer sent a letter to all senators on Monday arguing that the White House produce documents linked to an alleged effort to pressure the Ukrainian government to investigate President Trump's political rivals ahead of the Senate's impeachment trial.

The big picture: A batch of newly released emails showed that the Office of Management and Budget ordered the Pentagon to withhold military aid to Ukraine 91 minutes after President Trump's July phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Read the letterArrowUpdated Dec 24, 2019