A long line in Atlanta for Georgia's primary election on June 9. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

A federal judge on Monday ruled that polling places in Georgia must have at least one paper backup list of eligible voters, in case the electronic pollbooks used to check voter registration malfunction on Election Day.

The big picture: Voting integrity activists who brought the suit have argued the order could keep long lines, like the ones seen in Georgia's June primary, from forming again. The order also requires the state to have emergency paper ballots on hand in the case of voting machine malfunction.

What she's saying: "It is not too late for (election officials) to take these reasonable concrete measures to mitigate the real potential harms that would otherwise likely transpire at precinct polling locations grappling with the boiling brew created by the combination of new voting equipment issues and old voter data system deficiencies," wrote Totenberg in her latest order.

The other side: Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger said the state plans to appeal the ruling, AP reports.

  • State officials "are preparing Georgia for the biggest election turnout in history, and it will do so successfully despite the constant distraction of litigation filed by activists determined to undermine the credibility of our elections," Raffensperger said.

Read the full order, obtained by Georgia Public Broadcasting, via DocumentCloud:

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Pennsylvania Supreme Court rules mail-in ballots can't be rejected for mismatched signatures

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The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Friday that election officials cannot reject a mailed-in ballot because a voter’s signature may not resemble the one on their registration form.

Why it matters: The decision comes as a win for voting rights advocates and Democrats who say the signature disqualification rule can disenfranchise voters. In 2016, it was the top reason that ballots were rejected, with 28% of disqualified ballots flagged for non-matching signatures, according to the Election Assistance Commission.

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A U.S.-brokered ceasefire between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh crumbled within hours on Monday, leaving the month-old war rumbling on.

Why it matters: Nearly 5,000 people have been killed, according to Vladimir Putin’s rough estimate, including more than 100 civilians. Between 70,000 and 100,000 more are believed to have fled the fighting.