Esther Vargas / Flickr cc

In the past month:

  • June 5: Breitbart writer Katie McHugh has reportedly been fired after sending a series of incendiary tweets following the London Bridge terrorist attack.
  • June 4: CNN host Reza Aslan received heavy criticism and eventually apologized for tweeting inflammatory language about the president.
  • May 29: Denver Post reporter Terry Frei was fired for tweeting that he was uncomfortable with a Japanese driver winning the Indy 500 on Memorial Day weekend.
  • May 26: LBC radio host Katie Hopkins was fired for a tweet calling for a "final solution" to Islamic terrorism in wake of the Manchester terror attack
  • May 24: Freelance writer David Leavitt apologized for tweeting insensitive remarks following the Manchester terror attack.

Terrorism trend: A lot of these tweets and ones from the past year (extended list below) are related to inappropriate comments/language used around terrorist attacks.

Why it matters: The implication of this is best summed up in an opinion piece by Damon Linker published Saturday in TheWeek: "Twitter is a place where the emphasis on instantaneous reaction undermines the already-waning ideal of objectivity in the news, as journalists whose published work strives for fairness and balance regularly spout off in reaction to this or that event without a moment's pause of reflection or restraint."

In the past year:

  • January 31: New York Post reporter Bart Hubbuch was fired after sending a tweet that compared Trump's inauguration to 9/11 and Pearl Harbor.
  • December 14: Politico reporter Julia Ioffe was fired over an obscene tweet about Ivanka Trump.
  • October 13: Fox Business host Lou Dobbs apologized for tweeting the phone number and address of a Trump sexual harassment accuser.

Not just Twitter: This type of behavior has occurred on other social media outlets as well. A Politico editor resigned in November after publishing addresses of extremist leaders to Facebook.

Go deeper

Trump signs bill to prevent government shutdown

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel and President Trump arrives at the U.S. Capitol in March. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

President Trump signed a bill to extend current levels of government funding into the new fiscal year, White House spokesperson Judd Deere confirmed early Thursday.

Driving the news: The Senate on Tuesday passed the legislation to fund the federal government through Dec. 11, by a vote of 84-10.

Editor's note: This is a developing news story. Please check back for updates.

Updated 24 mins ago - Science

In photos: Deadly wildfires devastate California's wine country

The Shady Fire ravages a home as it approaches Santa Rosa in Napa County, California, on Sept. 28. The blaze is part of the massive Glass Fire Complex, which has razed over 51,620 acres at 2% containment. Photo: Samuel Corum/Agence France-Presse/AFP via Getty Images

More than 1700 firefighters are battling 26 major blazes across California, including in the heart of the wine country, where one mega-blaze claimed the lives of three people and forced thousands of others to evacuate this week.

The big picture: More than 8,100 wildfires have burned across a record 39 million-plus acres, killing 29 people and razing almost 7,900 structures in California this year, per Cal Fire. Just like the deadly blazes of 2017, the wine country has become a wildfires epicenter. Gov. Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency in Napa, Sonoma, and Shasta counties.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 33,880,896 — Total deaths: 1,012,964 — Total recoveries: 23,551,663Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 7,232,823 — Total deaths: 206,887 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: Moderna says its coronavirus vaccine won't be ready until 2021
  5. Travel: CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S. waters — Airlines begin mass layoffs while clinging to hope for federal aid
  6. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  7. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.