Updated Oct 17, 2019

Johnson's EU Brexit deal plan rejected by key U.K. government ally

Photo: Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's minority government partner, Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party, said in a statement Thursday that it can't back the Brexit deal he's negotiated with the European Union "as things stand."

Why it matters: It's a major blow to Johnson as the DUP's support is vital to his plan to get an agreement approved by the British Parliament. The United Kingdom is due to exit the EU on Oct. 31.

The big picture: Per Axios' Shane Savitsky, a major sticking point in negotiations had been the Irish backstop — which aims to prevent a hard border with customs controls between the EU member country Ireland and Northern Ireland, which is part of the U.K. It's the only land border the EU and U.K. would share.

  • AP reports that negotiators worked into the night Wednesday on regulations concerning customs and value-added tax, which would "regulate trade in goods" at the border.

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Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

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Everything you need to know about Brexit

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

On June 23, 2016, the United Kingdom shocked the world and voted to “Brexit,” or leave the European Union. After more than three years of uncertainty and fractured politics, the U.K. officially exited the EU on Jan. 31, 2020.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Oct 29, 2019 - World

Nigel Farage says Brexit extension would be better than Boris Johnson's deal

Photo: Peter Summers/Getty Images

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage told Sky News on Sunday that he'd prefer to extend the Brexit deadline past Oct. 31 in order to hold a general election than see Parliament pass the divorce deal struck by the EU and Prime Minister Boris Johnson last week.

"This is a rotten deal. ... I do understand because of Brexit fatigue and anger in the country the temptation to vote for it. But it is nothing more than Brexit in name only, it will not solve anything. This will not end things."
Go deeperArrowOct 20, 2019

Boris Johnson sends letter to EU requesting Brexit delay

Photo: Paul Ellis/AFP via Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson sent Saturday evening an unsigned photocopy of a letter requesting the European Union delay Brexit, ITV News reports. He also sent the EU an "explanatory letter" from the United Kingdom's ambassador to the EU and a letter signed by Johnson making it clear he doesn't want a delay to Brexit, per the Guardian.

Why it matters: Johnson had said he would rather be "dead in a ditch" than seek an extension. But he was legally required to send the Brexit delay request after the U.K. Parliament passed a law in September requiring him to seek a Brexit extension rather than crash out of the EU without a deal on Oct. 31.

Go deeperArrowOct 19, 2019