Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

John McEntee, President Trump’s former body man who was fired by former chief of staff John Kelly over security clearance issues and recently returned to the West Wing, is expected to lead the Presidential Personnel Office, according to two sources with direct knowledge.

Why it matters: Trump has increasingly become furious with what he sees as a federal government full of "never-Trumpers." Administration officials tell Axios Trump feels he’s surrounded by snakes and wants to clear out all the disloyal people.

  • Trump sees McEntee as the ultimate loyalist, and he has assigned him the powerful role of picking personnel across the federal government.
  • The New York Times' Maggie Haberman first reported that McEntee was returning to the White House.

What we're hearing: Trump has been asking for names of people he should fire. Many on the outside are more than happy to oblige.

  • He was furious about former D.C. Attorney Jessie Liu, who he had nominated to serve as the Treasury Department's undersecretary for terrorism and financial crimes, after hearing from a number of people, including Rep. Louie Gohmert, that Liu was someone not to be trusted.
  • As Axios first reported, Trump is now withdrawing her nomination.

The backdrop: Prior to working for Trump, McEntee, now 29, was the starting quarterback for the Connecticut Huskies football team.

  • He is very close with Stephen Miller from their days on Air Force One and the campaign.
  • McEntee’s move to PPO comes immediately after the news that Hope Hicks, former White House communications director and a close Trump aide, will also return to the White House and will work closely with Jared Kushner.

The bottom line: With McEntee at the helm of PPO, Trump’s hardcore allies will have a freer hand than ever with personnel across the federal government.

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