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Then-Senator Joe Biden (D-Del.) in 1974 (L) and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) when she was a schoolgirl (R). Photo: CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images/Sen. Kamala Harris' Twitter

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) dragged former Vice President Joe Biden’s record on civil rights into the bright lights of Thursday's debate stage, as she confronted him about his voting record on busing to integrate schools.

Driving the news: Harris spoke from personal experience: She was in the second class to integrate schools in Berkeley, Calif. Almost 10 days earlier, other Democratic rivals for the White House criticized Biden for describing his relationship with segregationists in the Senate, who had helped him pass an anti-busing amendment.

Flashback: The Supreme Court ruled in 1954 school segregation was unconstitutional, but two decades passed before changes began. The Supreme Court upheld the use of busing to integrate schools in 1971, but many Americans fought the change, including Biden.

Details:

  • In 1974 Biden opposed a measure that would have blocked busing, Politico reports.
  • But later that year, Biden said: "I have become convinced that busing is a bankrupt concept," according to PolitiFact.
  • He introduced an amendment to an appropriations bill that blocked federal funds to bus students or “assign students or teachers by race” to a school. It passed in 1975.
  • Biden thanked well-known segregationist Sen. James O. Eastland (D-Miss.) for Eastland's support in passing the Biden Amendment.

Go deeper: Kamala Harris' night: Schools Biden on busing

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
40 mins ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.