Updated Sep 15, 2019

Joe Biden warns of the "the domestic terrorism of white supremacy"

Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

In a speech Sunday morning at 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, Joe Biden warned about the return of "the domestic terrorism of white supremacy."

  • Four black girls were killed there 56 years ago today, in a bombing tied to the Ku Klux Klan.

Excerpts from Biden's remarks, as prepared for delivery:

"The domestic terrorism of white supremacy has been the antagonist of our highest ideals from before our founding — lynch mobs, arsonists, bomb makers and lone gunmen."

"And as we all now realize, this violence does not live in the past. The same poisonous ideology that lit the fuse at 16th Street pulled the trigger in Mother Emanuel [in Charleston], unleashed the anti-Semitic massacre in Pittsburgh and Poway [California], and saw a white supremacist gun down innocent Latino immigrants in an El Paso parking lot with military-grade weapons."

"We have not relegated racism and white supremacy to the pages of history."

"As Dr. King eulogized those girls, perhaps not even he could have imagined the day, nearly 50 years later, when this nation’s first black president would award them the Congressional Gold Medal."

"[C]hange comes — sometimes slowly, sometimes all at once."

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Chart: African-Americans jumping back faster into the workforce

Note: Seasonally adjusted; Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics via Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; Chart: Noa Yadidi/Axios

Jobless African-Americans are taking full-time work at a faster rate than unemployed whites, amid a more favorable economy for a population whose prospects have historically been dimmer than for other races.

Why it matters: A strong economy does not undo racism, and the same hurdles that make it difficult to find work have not disappeared. But a tighter labor market forces employers to look outside their usual pool of candidates to find workers.

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Where 2020 Democrats stand on gun control

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren introduced a new gun reform bill on Thursday with Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) that calls for raising the minimum age for all gun purchases to 21 and increasing the excise tax on gun sales to 30% and ammunition sales to 50%.

The big picture: 2019's mass shootings in El Paso, Texas; Dayton, Ohio; Virginia Beach; and near Odessa, Texas, have pushed 2020 Democrats to take harder stances on gun control than in the last presidential election, when Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton only briefly addressed the issue in their primary debate.

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Joe Biden's 2020 gun safety plan would reinstate assault weapons ban

Joe Biden at a campaign rally in Las Vegas. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden is out with an 11-page proposal to end gun violence in the United States.

The big picture: Biden's plan would ban the manufacture and sale of assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, but it would not call for a mandatory assault weapons buyback program as Beto O'Rourke has proposed.

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