Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden's campaign released on Tuesday a letter signed by 13 winners of the Nobel Prize in economics who say that while their views are different, they all think his policies "will result in economic growth that is faster, more robust, and more equitable."

Our thought bubble, via Axios Hans Nichols: These economist letters are often little more than veiled job applications from academics hoping for a Fed or White House position. But given that these laureates are éminence grises of American economics, they probably just want to be on the record supporting Biden.

Read the letter.

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