Oct 8, 2019

Joe Biden's higher education plan includes free community college

Joe Biden speaking at a candidate forum. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Joe Biden's 2020 campaign unveiled a $750 billion higher education plan Tuesday that includes tuition-free community and technical college — with the federal government picking up 75% of the cost and allowing states to cover the rest — as well as more generous federal college loan programs, per the AP.

The state of play: Biden's plan isn't as far reaching as those put forth by his opponents, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, who both offer plans exceeding $1 trillion. Sanders' plan proposes eliminating all student loan debt, while Warren calls for broad debt relief based on income.

Go deeper ... Debt-free college: Where the 2020 presidential candidates stand

Go deeper

Debt-free college: Where the 2020 presidential candidates stand

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and Sen. Cory Booker. Photo: Getty Images.

A clear divide exists among 2020 Democrats who are rolling out plans to tackle the student debt crisis, whether tuition-free or debt-free policies are the way to win voter support.

By the numbers: Student debt in the United States has reached $1.5 trillion, and it is responsible for much of millennials and Generation X's anguish.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Oct 8, 2019

The Warren-Sanders turning point

Data: RealClearPolitics; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Nobody noticed it at the time, but in one week in April, the tide of the Democratic primary flipped irreversibly, leading to the emergence of Elizabeth Warren — not Bernie Sanders — as the clear progressive favorite in the 2020 field.

Why it matters: That week coincides with the addition of Joe Biden to the field and the story that has generated more interactions on social media than any other piece about Warren this year, according to data from NewsWhip exclusively provided to Axios: the release of her student debt cancellation plan.

Go deeperArrowOct 27, 2019

Warren would exhaust wealth tax with $800 billion education plan

Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Elizabeth Warren announced a sweeping $800 billion public education plan on Monday, but it would exhaust the remainder of the $2.75 trillion that she says would be raised under her wealth tax proposal, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: The announcement comes at a time when she's been criticized for dodging questions from her 2020 Democratic rivals on how she plans to pay for "Medicare for All."

Go deeperArrowOct 21, 2019