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Joe Biden rolled out a health care plan Monday whose policies and political priorities are both rooted firmly in the Affordable Care Act.

Details: The cornerstone of Biden's proposal is a new public insurance option, which would compete alongside private insurance. The public plan would be available to everyone, even people who get their coverage from an employer. That's an important difference from the one that was debated in 2010.

  • Biden also would make the ACA's premium subsides more generous and more widely available.

On cost control, the plan would give Medicare the power to directly negotiate drug prices and establish a new board to determine a fair price for new, first-in-class drugs.

  • Drugmakers would also have to pay a tax if they raise their prices above inflation.
  • There's a proposal to end surprise hospital billing, but otherwise not a lot in there on hospital costs.

One potential controversy: Biden's new public option would automatically take the place of the Medicaid expansion in states that haven't expanded.

  • States that have expanded would have to keep paying their share of the bill for the expansion.
  • In other words, non-expansion states would get a better deal than those that participated in the expansion — arguably, rewarding their resistance to the ACA.

The bottom line: Health care may be the most defining substantive policy disagreement among the 2020 field.

  • Biden's proposal is more ambitious than anything that was seriously on the table during the ACA debate, but looks decidedly moderate compared to Bernie Sanders' plan — which is significantly more ambitious than almost any other health care system in the world.

Go deeper: Joe Biden on the issues, in under 500 words

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Facebook boycott organizers share details on their Zuckerberg meeting

Facebook is in the midst of the largest ad boycott in its history, with nearly 1,000 brands having stopped paid advertising in July because they feel Facebook hasn't done enough to remove hate speech from its namesake app and Instagram.

Axios Re:Cap spoke with the boycott's four main organizers, who met on Tuesday with CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other top Facebook executives, to learn why they organized the boycott, what they took from the meeting, and what comes next.

Boycott organizers slam Facebook following tense virtual meeting

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Civil rights leaders blasted Facebook's top executives shortly after speaking with them on Tuesday, saying that the tech giant's leaders "failed to meet the moment" and were "more interested in having a dialogue than producing outcomes."

Why it matters: The likely fallout from the meeting is that the growing boycott of Facebook's advertising platform, which has reached nearly 1000 companies in less than a month, will extend longer than previously anticipated, deepening Facebook's public relations nightmare.

Steve Scalise PAC invites donors to fundraiser at Disney World

Photo: Kevin Lamarque-Pool/Getty Images

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise’s PAC is inviting lobbyists to attend a four-day “Summer Meeting” at Disney World's Polynesian Village in Florida, all but daring donors to swallow their concern about coronavirus and contribute $10,000 to his leadership PAC.

Why it matters: Scalise appears to be the first House lawmakers to host an in-person destination fundraiser since the severity of pandemic became clear. The invite for the “Summer Meeting” for the Scalise Leadership Fund, obtained by Axios, makes no mention of COVID-19.