Joe Biden at an event in March. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Joe Biden sent a letter to the Secretary of the Senate on Friday asking for a search of his records to try to locate a sexual harassment complaint that Tara Reade allegedly made in 1993 about Biden.

Why it matters: In the letter, Biden goes farther than just asking to release a complaint if it exists — he asks to make public "all other documents in the records that relate to the allegation."

  • Biden said that he would do this when he addressed Reade's allegations for the first time this morning in a statement and subsequent TV interview with MSNBC's "Morning Joe."

What they're saying: "I request that you take or direct whatever steps are necessary to establish the location of the records of this Office, and once they have been located, to direct a search for the alleged complaint and to make public the results of this search," Biden wrote in the letter.

  • "I would ask that the public release include not only a complaint if one exists, but any and all other documents in the records that relate to the allegation."

Go deeper: Some Democrats want more from Biden on sexual assault allegations.

Go deeper

Updated Aug 18, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Axios-NewsWhip 2020 attention tracker library

Updated 17 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Pence no longer expected to attend Barrett confirmation vote after COVID exposure.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week — U.S. reports over 80,000 new cases for second consecutive day.
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. World: Restrictions grow across Europe.
  6. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.
Dave Lawler, author of World
43 mins ago - World

U.S.-brokered ceasefire collapses in Nagorno-Karabakh

Volunteer fighters in Stepanakert, the capital of Nagorno-Karabakh. Photo: Aris Messinis/AFP via Getty Images

A U.S.-brokered ceasefire between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh crumbled within hours on Monday, leaving the month-old war rumbling on.

Why it matters: Nearly 5,000 people have been killed, according to Vladimir Putin’s rough estimate, including more than 100 civilians. Between 70,000 and 100,000 more are believed to have fled the fighting.