Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Biden and Jarrett at the White House in 2016. (Photo: Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Joe Biden is turning to a diverse, younger generation of Obama White House alums to fill high-level campaign positions as he gears up for the general election.

Driving the news: In the past few weeks, four former staffers who worked for Obama confidante Valerie Jarrett joined Biden’s campaign.

  • Karine Jean-Pierre, Julie Chavez Rodríguez, and Ashley Allison all joined within one week starting May 20, in senior adviser roles.
  • Yohannes Abraham joined the Biden campaign's transition team in late June.
  • All are women or men of color. All were longtime Obama White House staffers and worked with Jarrett in different capacities in her roles including senior adviser and directing public engagement and intergovernmental affairs.

Why it matters: Biden's campaign is seeking to elevate a younger generation of Democrats and add more diversity to its top ranks after facing early criticism over the homogeneity of Biden's brain trust.

  • Biden allies also see a benefit to bolstering ties to Obama and his inner circle, and they say it makes sense to add people with White House experience in senior roles.

The big picture: These hires are coming on board as Obama steps up his own public engagement for Biden.

  • Obama's first joint virtual fundraiser with his former vice president, held on June 23, brought in $7.6M from over 175,000 donors.
  • Biden and Obama have acknowledged that the coronavirus is forcing a restructuring of presidential campaigns and keeping them off the trail, even as President Trump is hosting in-person rallies.
  • But because of the pandemic — and since it's the beginning of summer, typically a slower time for politics — Biden has been able to devote more attention to building his campaign infrastructure and committees before the general election debates start in September.

Amid questions around Biden’s age and what that means for who he selects as a running mate, these hires show how the campaign is positioning a younger generation of former Obama aides to land the plane in November.

What they're saying: "It’s all hands on deck," Jarrett told Axios. "Frankly, I don’t know anyone in that orbit who hasn’t said, ‘Count me in, I’d like to be help in any way possible.’”

  • Obama hinted at this idea when he said in that fundraiser: "I am here to say help is on the way."
  • "We viewed ourselves as members of the team — not as free agents," Jarrett said. "That’s a real strength in all of the folks from my team. They each want to be a force for good."
  • Part of Biden's core campaign message is around his government competency. One Obama alum tells Axios: "By lifting up these particular individuals, he’s giving the rest of us a window into who’s going to help run the show in the White House, and I think that’s engendering more confidence in him."

Go deeper

Poll shows Biden with 12-point lead in Pennsylvania

Supporters outside the Amtrak station in Latrobe, Pa., for Biden. Photo: Jeff Swensen/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Joe Biden now has a 12-point lead over President Trump in Pennsylvania, according to a Monmouth University poll out Tuesday, which also found that a majority of voters in the battleground state think Biden better understands their daily concerns.

Why it matters: It's more bad news for Trump, whose re-election efforts have hinged on winning Pennsylvania and its 20 electoral votes. Biden's current lead is a significant improvement from his four-point lead in last month's Monmouth poll.

Biden calls for unity at Gettysburg

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Joe Biden on Tuesday traveled to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, home to the Civil War battlefield where Abraham Lincoln once called for national unity, to ask Americans to come together to defeat racial injustice and the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Pennsylvania, a swing state that was crucial to President Trump's 2016 win, could deliver the election to Biden next month. A new Monmouth University poll out Tuesday shows Biden expanding his lead over Trump in the state.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Oct 6, 2020 - Economy & Business

Quantifying women's workplace crisis

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

We're starting to see evidence of the coronavirus' erosion of women's workplace gains: 865,000 American women left the labor force in September, compared with 216,000 men.

Why it matters: Many of the women dropping out hold senior-level positions at companies, and their exit from the workforce means the already-abysmal representation of women in leadership at U.S. firms will get even worse.