Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden said during a stop on his book tour Monday in Montana that his prior work on some of the country's most pressing issues leads him to believe he's "the most qualified person in the country to be president," CNN reports.

"I am a gaffe machine, but my God what a wonderful thing compared to a guy who can't tell the truth ... No one should run for the job unless they believe that they would be qualified doing the job. I've been doing this my whole adult life, and the issues that are the most consequential relating to the plight of the middle class and our foreign policy are things that I have — even my critics would acknowledge, I may not be right but I know a great deal about it."

The big picture: Biden said he will make a decision about 2020 with his family in the next two months. Axios' Jonathan Swan reported in October that Biden is the potential opponent Trump's staff worries about most, as they fear he'll steal Trump voters from the Midwest and cut into the president's dominance among white men and whites without college degrees.

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17 mins ago - Health

Pelosi: Birx "enabled" Trump on coronavirus misinformation

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told CNN on Monday she does not have confidence in White House coronavirus task force coordinator Deborah Birx because "she has enabled" President Trump to spread coronavirus misinformation.

What she's saying: "I don't have confidence in anyone who stands there while the president says, 'Swallow Lysol and it's going to cure your virus,'" Pelosi told host Jim Scuitto.

24 mins ago - Technology

Google launches $349 Pixel 4a

Google

Google on Monday launched its long-expected Pixel 4a, a $349 device that brings key features of the company's flagship smartphone to a more affordable price point.

Why it matters: Google saw surprisingly strong demand for last year's "a" model and having a broader range of products allows the company to reach more parts of the market.

A wild weekend for Microsoft's play for TikTok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

While its Big Tech rivals were testifying in front of a congressional antitrust committee last week, Microsoft was negotiating what could be the largest — and most politically perilous — tech acquisition of 2020.

The state of play: The hullabaloo surrounding Microsoft picking up TikTok has undergone a flurry of twists and turns over the weekend, as both the White House and the tech giant reacted in real time.