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Jill Biden shut down a question from CNN's Jake Tapper on her husband's occasional gaffes while on the campaign trail, saying "you cannot even go there."

What she's saying: “After Donald Trump, you cannot even say the word ‘gaffe,'" Biden said in an interview that aired during CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday.

The exchange:

TAPPER: "Your husband has been known to make the occasional gaffe."
BIDEN: "You cannot even go there. After Donald Trump, you cannot even say the word 'gaffe.'"
TAPPER: "I can’t even say the word gaffe. "
BIDEN: "Nope. Done, it’s gone."
TAPPER: "The gaffe issue is over because - "
BIDEN: "Over. So over. "

The bottom line: Biden told Tapper she believes her husband is ready for Tuesday's presidential debate.

  • "Oh my gosh, yes he’s ready. One of the things I'm excited for is when the American people see Joe Biden up there on that stage, they're going to see what a president looks like."

Go deeper: Cleanup on aisle Biden

Go deeper

Updated Dec 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The top Republicans who have acknowledged Biden as president-elect

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Some elected Republicans are breaking ranks with President Trump to acknowledge that President-elect Biden won the 2020 presidential election.

Why it matters: The relative sparsity of acknowledgements highlights Trump's lasting power in the GOP, as his campaign moves to file multiple lawsuits alleging voter fraud in key swing states — despite the fact that there have been no credible allegations of any widespread fraud anywhere in the U.S.

Jul 1, 2020 - Science

Trump vs. Biden: Senility becomes 2020 flashpoint

Photos: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Senility is becoming an overt line of attack for the first time in a modern U.S. presidential campaign.

Why it matters: As Americans live longer and work later into life and there's more awareness about the science of aging, we're also seeing politicians test the boundaries of electability. Biden is 77; Trump, now 74, already is the oldest person to assume the U.S. presidency.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.