Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams reflected on the death of George Floyd on Politico's "Pulse Check" podcast Wednesday, noting the similarities between himself and the 46-year-old black man killed by a Minneapolis police officer last month.

What they're saying: "That could be me, pulled over for speeding five miles over the speed limit. That could be me with a busted tail light," Adams said. "That could be me who is just seen as a black man and not as the surgeon general of the United States."

  • "Especially if I'm not wearing a uniform, but I'm casually dressed in my hoodie and tennis shoes and athletic apparel — and that could be me on the side of a road with a knee in my neck," he added.

Why it matters: Adams, the nation's top doctor since 2017, is one of the most prominent African American officials serving in the Trump administration. Yet the surgeon general still says he's been racially profiled throughout his life and detained on several occasions by police and security guards on false accusations.

  • "I think really it’s why you have so many people angry and frustrated, because they saw that. They saw that," Adams said.
  • "And they didn't see George Floyd alone. They saw themselves. They saw their faces there with that knee on their necks."

The big picture: Adams, who serves on the White House coronavirus task force, said he understands why protestors are circumventing public health guidance and gathering en masse to call for police reform. He urged Americans to take precautions like wearing masks and using hand sanitizer.

  • "I understand the anger, the frustration, the fear and why people feel that that they need to prioritize going out and protesting," he said.
  • "What I say to people as a physician is, if you're going to do something, I want to help you understand your risk and ... how to do it as safely as possible."

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Updated Sep 25, 2020 - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

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Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Note: Does not include probable deaths from New York City; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state will move forward with its own review of coronavirus vaccines even if the Food and Drug Administration approves one or more for distribution and public use.

Why it matters: The motion could sow further public doubt that the federal government could release a vaccine based on political motives rather than safety and efficacy.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 32,471,119 — Total deaths: 987,593 — Total recoveries: 22,374,557Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 7,032,524 — Total deaths: 203,657 — Total recoveries: 2,727,335 — Total tests: 99,483,712Map.
  3. States: "We’re not closing anything going forward": Florida fully lifts COVID restaurant restrictions — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam tests positive for coronavirus.
  4. Health: Young people accounted for 20% of cases this summer.
  5. Business: Coronavirus has made airports happier places The expiration of Pandemic Unemployment Assistance looms.
  6. Education: Where bringing students back to school is most risky.
Mike Allen, author of AM
11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden pushes unity message in new TV wave

A fresh Joe Biden ad, "New Start," signals an effort by his campaign to make unity a central theme, underscoring a new passage in his stump speech that says he won't be a president just for Democrats but for all Americans.

What he's saying: The ad — which began Friday night, and is a follow-up to "Fresh Start" — draws from a Biden speech earlier in the week in Manitowoc, Wisconsin: