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Sessions gives a speech in Washington, DC. Photo: Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a rare public statement Thursday in which he appeared to push back against President Trump, hours after Trump criticized him in a Fox News interview for failing to take control of the Justice Department.

"The actions of the Department of Justice will not be improperly influenced by political considerations ... I demand the highest standards, and where they are not met, I take action."
— Sessions, in a statement posted to Twitter by DOJ spokesperson Sarah Isgur Flores.

The backdrop: After being asked by Fox News' Ainsley Earhardt whether he would consider firing Sessions, Trump said...

“I put in an attorney general who never took control of the Justice Department ... I wanted to stay uninvolved but when everyone sees what’s going on in the Justice Department — I always put 'justice' now in quotes — it’s a very, very sad day. Jeff Sessions recused himself, which he shouldn’t have done.”

Republican Senators Lindsey Graham (S.C.) and Chuck Grassley (Iowa) also signaled Thursday that Trump may fire Sessions after the November midterm elections:

  • Graham told reporters: "The president’s entitled to an attorney general he has faith in ... I think there will come a time, sooner rather than later, where it will be time to have a new face and a fresh voice at the Department of Justice. Clearly, Attorney General Sessions doesn’t have the confidence of the president.”
  • Grassley said in an interview that he’d be able to schedule hearings to confirm a new attorney general, despite previously stating he was too busy to address the issue, per Bloomberg.

Meanwhile, John Cornyn (R-Tex.) defended Sessions while speaking to reporters:

  • “I think it would be bad for the country, it would be bad for the president, it would be bad for the Department of Justice for him to be forced out under these circumstances. So I hope he stays the course and I hope cooler heads prevail."

Full statement:

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

What to watch: Sessions is at the White House this afternoon for a meeting with Trump, Jared Kushner and Brooke Rollins to discuss prison and sentencing reform.

Go deeper: Trump says" flipping" for a reduced sentence "almost ought to be illegal."

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.