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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Friends of Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump tell us they have the strong impression they are now preparing to stay in D.C. as long as the president does, meaning they'll outlast almost everyone in the West Wing.

What we're hearing: A White House official with direct knowledge of the situation told Axios that in recent months, Jared and Ivanka have spent a good deal of time with the president in the private dining room adjoining the Oval Office and in the residence.

  • West Wing watchers note that they weren't accompanied by White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, a rival power center to "Javanka."

Ivanka's announcement this week that she's shutting down her fashion brand — and the messaging that accompanied her decision — sent a clear signal they're not going anywhere.

  • These two children of real-estate moguls are liking Washington, according to friends.
  • And the president has become such a pariah in many Manhattan social circles that it's not as if a hero's welcome awaits them back home.

Why it matters: Javanka have had some epic internal fights — Steve Bannon and Rex Tillerson were their two most savage — but it's now clear it would take an event of extraordinarily damaging proportions to blow them out of this White House.

  • Jared getting his security clearance obviously helped. But it's also true that we in the media — in reporting their potential fates as a rollercoaster narrative — sometimes forgot perhaps the most stable truism of Trumpworld: It's a family business.

After a burst of publicity in the opening months of the administration, both have been working much more quietly on specific issues rather than serving as de facto Secretaries of Everything, as their rivals jabbed in the early days:

  • Jared wants to see through the Israeli-Palestinian deal and NAFTA negotiations, and is working on government tech modernization and prison reform.
  • Ivanka remains focused on promoting paid family leave and childcare development. She is an architect of workforce development plans, announced last week, that are designed to help employees and employers prepare for the coming wave of automation.
  • Given that the couple's policy passions include Democrat-friendly issues — especially prison reform and child care — the value of their portfolio could rise if voters choose divided government in November.

Both will also play roles in the midterms and 2020 presidential campaign:

  • Jared will continue his behind-the-scenes role working on politics with reelection campaign manager Brad Parscale, Republican National Committee Chair Ronna Romney McDaniel and Eric Trump.
  • Ivanka will likely be onstage at key moments and in strategic locations, such as the suburbs where Trump is vulnerable with college-educated women.

One thing about Jared and Ivanka that has deeply frustrated Kelly — as a general as well as chief of staff — is that they enjoy family privileges and live outside his chain of command, even though as staff they are technically under his authority.

  • Jared and Ivanka's internal opponents have largely either been fired (Bannon and former Secretary of State Tillerson being the prime examples), or have less sway these days (Kelly).
  • Javanka also have some powerful allies remaining in the administration's top ranks: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

Be smart: Whenever Kelly departs, Javanka will be further empowered. They have outlived their enemies, and have a firmer grip on power than ever. No wonder friends say they are feeling emboldened, and aren't going anywhere.

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Go deeper

Indianapolis mass shooting suspect legally bought 2 guns, police say

Marion County Forensic Services vehicles are parked at the site of a mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Friday. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

The suspected gunman in this week's mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis legally purchased two assault rifles believed to have been used in the attack, police said late Saturday.

Of note: The Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department's statement that Brandon Scott Hole, 19, bought the rifles last July and September comes a day after the FBI said in a statement to news outlets that a "shotgun was seized" from the suspect in March 2020 after his mother raised concerns about his mental health.

U.S. and China agree to take joint climate action

US Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry waves as he arrives at the Elysee Presidential Palace on March 10, 2021 in Paris. Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

Despite an increasingly tense relationship, the U.S. and China agreed Saturday to work together to tackle global climate change, including by "raising ambition" for emissions cuts during the 2020s — a key goal of the Biden administration.

Why it matters: The joint communique released Saturday evening commits the world's two largest emitters of greenhouse gases to work together to keep the most ambitious temperature target contained in the Paris Climate Agreement viable by potentially taking additional emissions cuts prior to 2030.

Biden defends not immediately raising refugee cap

President Biden speaking with reporters after leaving his cart following his first round of golf as president at Wilmington Country Club in Wilmington, Delaware, on Saturday. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden on Saturday sought to explain why he didn't immediately lift the Trump administration's historically low refugee cap.

Driving the news: Several Democrats accused Biden Friday of not fulfilling his pledge to raise the limit after it was announced he'd keep the cap. The White House said later it would be raised by May 15. Biden told reporters Saturday, "We're going to increase the number."

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