President Trump's senior adviser Jared Kushner told me during an exclusive interview with Israel's Channel 13 News that the president’s "record of accomplishments is unimpeachable" — and that "he hasn't done anything wrong."

Why it matters: Kushner is one of the officials working on the White House's impeachment strategy, per CNN — but this is the first time he has spoken publicly about the issue since the Ukraine scandal erupted.

  • Kushner told me that House Democrats have been trying to impeach Trump for the last three years but that all their efforts had failed.
  • He added: "The best thing going for the president is that he hasn't done anything wrong, and, at this point, they investigated him over and over and over again. I think the American people are sick and tired of it."

The big picture: Kushner argued the Trump administration had notched many achievements, like lowering drug prices, completing trade deals and creating jobs.

  • He criticized congressional Democrats, saying, "If they want to play silly games we will obviously deal with that in an appropriate manner but we are not going to let that distract us as an administration."

Between the lines: Trump is counting on the historically low unemployment and high stock gains during his tenure as insurance with voters should he be impeached by the House, Axios' Margaret Talev reported.

  • If the economy tanks before November 2020, he plans to blame Democrats for fomenting uncertainty and gridlock via impeachment.

Yes, but: Despite Kushner's confidence, Trump has told friends and allies he worries about the stain impeachment will leave on his legacy, per Axios' Jonathan Swan and Alayna Treene.

  • Trump believes that impeachment could help him get re-elected and win back the House, but he doesn't want the history books recording him as an impeached president.

Go deeper: The West Wing's impeachment war room

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General Motors tries to revive incendiary lawsuit vs. Fiat Chrysler

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

General Motors is trying to revive an incendiary lawsuit against Fiat Chrysler Automobiles with explosive new allegations including bribes paid from secret offshore bank accounts and a union official acting as a double agent between the two automotive giants.

Why it matters: The extraordinary legal battle is occurring amid earth-shaking changes in the global auto industry that threaten to turn both litigants into dinosaurs if they aren't nimble enough to pivot to a future where transportation is a service, cars run on electrons and a robot handles the driving.

2 hours ago - Health

Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning

Gov. Cuomo on July 23 in New York City. Photo: Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that all school districts across the state can choose to reopen for in-person learning because it has so far maintained low enough coronavirus transmission rates.

Why it matters: It’s another sign that the state, once the global epicenter of the pandemic, has — at least for now — successfully curbed the spread of the virus even as infections have surged elsewhere around the country.

Appeals court allows House Democrats to continue lawsuit for Don McGahn testimony

Don McGahn in an October 2018 Cabinet meeting. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A D.C. appeals court on Friday allowed House Democrats to continue their case for testimony from former White House counsel Don McGahn before the House Judiciary Committee.

Why it matters: The ruling has broader implications beyond this specific instance, agreeing that Congress has the standing to sue to enforce subpoenas against executive branch officials even if the White House refuses to comply.