President Trump's senior adviser Jared Kushner told me during an exclusive interview with Israel's Channel 13 News that the president’s "record of accomplishments is unimpeachable" — and that "he hasn't done anything wrong."

Why it matters: Kushner is one of the officials working on the White House's impeachment strategy, per CNN — but this is the first time he has spoken publicly about the issue since the Ukraine scandal erupted.

  • Kushner told me that House Democrats have been trying to impeach Trump for the last three years but that all their efforts had failed.
  • He added: "The best thing going for the president is that he hasn't done anything wrong, and, at this point, they investigated him over and over and over again. I think the American people are sick and tired of it."

The big picture: Kushner argued the Trump administration had notched many achievements, like lowering drug prices, completing trade deals and creating jobs.

  • He criticized congressional Democrats, saying, "If they want to play silly games we will obviously deal with that in an appropriate manner but we are not going to let that distract us as an administration."

Between the lines: Trump is counting on the historically low unemployment and high stock gains during his tenure as insurance with voters should he be impeached by the House, Axios' Margaret Talev reported.

  • If the economy tanks before November 2020, he plans to blame Democrats for fomenting uncertainty and gridlock via impeachment.

Yes, but: Despite Kushner's confidence, Trump has told friends and allies he worries about the stain impeachment will leave on his legacy, per Axios' Jonathan Swan and Alayna Treene.

  • Trump believes that impeachment could help him get re-elected and win back the House, but he doesn't want the history books recording him as an impeached president.

Go deeper: The West Wing's impeachment war room

Go deeper

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