Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

A migrant worker is tested by security at a factory in Singapore. Photo: Ore Huiying/Getty Images

Japan and Singapore were glimmers of hope throughout the coronavirus pandemic, but now both countries are struggling to control the breakout as new waves of infections hit the two countries.

Why it matters: The new wave of outbreaks highlights holes in their health systems and response strategies.

In Singapore: The country reported a high of 942 new cases on Saturday, bringing the total number of cases to almost 6,000, AP reports.

  • Foreign workers live in crowded factory dormitories, with 12-20 people sharing a room, and make up about 60% of Singapore's cases.
  • Migrant labor rights groups have warned for years that these conditions would eventually cause widespread problems, The Washington Post writes.
  • Tens of thousands of workers are quarantined to their rooms with some moving to safer places due to crowding.

In Japan: The country's often-praised hospital system is near its breaking point as hospitals are being forced to turn away patients and struggle with staff and equipment shortages, AP writes.

  • Japan's initial plan to close spaces like clubs and gyms initially worked, but the virus still spread with many new cases being untraceable.
  • Some Japanese emergency rooms are even turning away patients suffering from strokes, heart attacks or external injuries.
  • Experts blame the government for not embracing social distancing, a shortage of medical gear and equipment for the worsening situation, per AP.
  • There are fears that Japan's outbreak could worsen.

Elsewhere:

  • South Korea has had success controlling the outbreak through mass testing and quickly flattened the curve of outbreaks. However, more than 160 patients tested positive for the virus after initially recovering from it — suggesting the virus lasts longer than initially anticipated, The Wall Street Journal notes.
  • In China, Axios' Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian said China's numbers changes show that Beijing is likely responding to both domestic and international pressure regarding how it evaluates the number of dead in Wuhan.

Go deeper... Map: World coronavirus updates

Go deeper

What we know about the victims of the Indianapolis mass shooting

Officials load a body into a vehicle at the site of the mass shooting in Indianapolis. Photo:

Eight people who were killed along with several others who were injured in a Thursday evening shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis have been identified by local law enforcement.

The big picture: The Sikh Coalition said at least four of the eight victims were members of the Indianapolis Sikh community.

Pompeo, wife misused State Dept. resources, federal watchdog finds

Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The State Department's independent watchdog found that former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo violated federal ethics rules when he and his wife asked department employees to perform personal tasks on more than 100 occasions, including picking up their dog and making private dinner reservations.

Why it matters: The report comes as Pompeo pours money into a new political group amid speculation about a possible 2024 presidential run.