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Jaime Harrison, the Democrat running against Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, told Alexi McCammond for "Axios on HBO" that he's driven partly by the pain that Black people have long felt, but that now is getting more attention.

  • "This pain is not new," Harrison said. "That's why I'm working so hard, so that the next generation doesn't have to work hard like this."

"It is hard when I talk to friends and they say the hardest thing that they have to tell their kids is that Santa Claus ain't real," Harrison continued in the emotional interview.

  • "Well for me, I got two Black boys. And the hardest thing that I have to do is tell them that one day they may lose their life because of the color of their skin."
  • "We are about to close the chapter on the old South and start a whole brand new book that I call the new South. A new South that is bold, that is inclusive, that is diverse."

More from the Jamie Harrison interview.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 11, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The latest: Biden's Georgia win

Expand chart
Data: AP; Note: AP has called Arizona for Biden, but ballots are still being counted and not all organizations have called it yet. Chart: Naema Ahmed, Andrew Witherspoon, Danielle Alberti/Axios

President-elect Joe Biden's projected Georgia win will give him 306 electoral votes over President Trump — virtually matching Trump's margin over Hillary Clinton in 2016.

The latest: Trump has not yet conceded after Biden surpassed the 270 electoral vote threshold needed to capture the presidency. Instead, his legal team, led by Rudy Giuliani, has been spinning baseless conspiracy theories and throwing out evidence-free accusations of fraud.

Collins helps contractor before pro-Susan PAC gets donation

Sen. Susan Collins during her reelection campaign. Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

A PAC backing Sen. Susan Collins in her high-stakes reelection campaign received $150,000 from an entity linked to the wife of a defense contractor whose firm Collins helped land a federal contract, new public records show.

Why it matters: The executive, Martin Kao of Honolulu, leaned heavily on his political connections to boost his business, federal prosecutors say in an ongoing criminal case against him. The donation linked to Kao was veiled until last week.

How cutting GOP corporate cash could backfire

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Companies pulling back on political donations, particularly to members of Congress who voted against certifying President Biden's election win, could inadvertently push Republicans to embrace their party's rightward fringe.

Why it matters: Scores of corporate PACs have paused, scaled back or entirely abandoned their political giving programs. While designed to distance those companies from events that coincided with this month's deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol, research suggests the moves could actually empower the far-right.

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