Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

The top lawmakers on the Senate Intelligence Committee. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg will tell Congress on Wednesday that their platforms have taken significant steps to curb foreign election interference — while Dorsey also goes to great lengths to portray his as unbiased.

Why it matters: Midterms are approaching, and with renewed allegations of liberal bias on web platforms, the Silicon Valley executives' remarks will be watched closely by both sides of the aisle.

What they'll say:

  • Sandberg will paint Facebook as having learned the lessons of the 2016 election, when Russian operatives used the platform to push out content on divisive political conversations. "We were too slow to spot this and too slow to act," she'll tell members of the Senate Intelligence Committee. "The actions we’ve taken in response — beginning with the steps Facebook’s General Counsel, Colin Stretch, outlined to this Committee last year — show our determination to do everything we can to stop this kind of interference from happening."
  • Dorsey will also tell the House Energy and Commerce Committee later in the day that Twitter does not disadvantage conservatives who use the platform. "Let me be clear about one important and foundational fact: Twitter does not use political ideology to make any decisions, whether related to ranking content on our service or how we enforce our rules," he plans to say.

Google's top lawyer Kent Walker, who the Intelligence Committee rejected as a witness because it wanted to hear from a C-level executive from the company, nonetheless submitted written testimony to the panel outlining "the efforts we’re making to secure our platforms ahead of the 2018 midterm elections in the US and for future elections around the world."

  • The panel expects to keep an empty chair open for Google.

What's next: The Senate hearing kicks off Wednesday morning, with the House hearing in the afternoon.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Updated 3 hours ago - Technology

Apple's quarterly sales top $100 billion for first time

Credit: Apple

Spurred by strong sales of the latest iPhones, Apple reported it took in a record $111 billion in revenue for the three months ended Dec. 31, as the company crushed expectations.

Why it matters: The move showed even a pandemic didn't dull demand for Apple's latest smartphones.