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Photo: Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

It's the new "depends on what the meaning of the word 'is' is" — President Bill Clinton's instant-classic evasion in grand jury testimony in 1998.

What's happening: President Trump's comment about the virus to Jonathan Swan on "Axios on HBO" — "It is what it is" — became an online sensation.

Now, it’s being invoked repeatedly by prime-time speakers at the Democratic National Convention:

  • Michelle Obama: "Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head. He cannot meet this moment. He simply cannot be who we need him to be for us. It is what it is."
  • Bill Clinton: "When asked about the surge in deaths, he shrugged and said, 'It is what it is.' But did it have to be this way?"
  • Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer: "Donald Trump says, 'It is what it is.' Presidents should never say, 'It is what it is.' President Lincoln, honoring the great sacrifice at Gettysburg, didn’t say, 'It is what it is.' President Roosevelt — seeing a third of the nation ill-housed, ill-clad and ill-nourished — didn’t say, 'It is what it is.'"

Go deeper: Follow Axios' full conventions coverage

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Go deeper

Incoming chief of staff: “Trump’s Twitter feed doesn’t make Joe Biden president or not president”

Ron Klain, Biden's incoming chief of staff, told Chuck Todd on "Meet the Press" Sunday that "Donald Trump's Twitter feed doesn't make Joe Biden president or not president."

Driving the news: President Trump on Sunday briefly appeared to acknowledge Biden as the winner of the 2020 election for the first time, albeit in a tweet littered with false accusations that the election was rigged. Trump later walked back his tweet and said he was not conceding the race.

President Joe Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Joe Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 48 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden and Vice President Harris review readiness of military troops, a long-standing tradition to signify the peaceful transfer of power.